""

about | Maps & Directions | contact | admissions | faculty | alumni & development | library | Tech Support Center | dean's office | Policies & Procedures

Tissue culture facility provides neuronal cell cultures to investigators Treatment of experimental animals with brain tumors with therapeutic agents Analyzing proteins from neuronal cells upon exposure to neurtropic agents

department of Neuroscience and

center for neurovirology

Overview

Department of Neuroscience Objectives and Programs

Center for Neurovirology Objectives and Achievements

Cooperative Interaction of CNV with Various Departments and

Centers at Temple University

 

Department of Neuroscience Objectives and Programs

 

The primary objective of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple University School of Medicine is to become an internationally recognized research and educational entity for conducting innovative research in basic and translational neuroscience in areas including:

  • Neuroinfection and neurovirology
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neural regulation and plasticity
  • Neural cell proliferation
  • Neuroimmune interaction and inflammation

In this setting, we will target diseases including:

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Brain tumors
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • AIDS dementia
  • Other viral and non-viral induced disorders of the nervous system

Further, the newly established graduate program in biomedical neuroscience will provide a high quality education to graduate (PhD) and medical (MD/PhD) students, take the lead in offering quality education in neuroscience to Temple University medical students, and train postdoctoral fellows in basic and clinical neuroscience. Our students enrolled in a new NIH-funded training program on NeuroAIDS will advance their interest in this area of neuroscience.


Return to top

 

 

Center for Neurovirology Objectives and Achievements

 

The Center for Neurovirology (CNV), with its highly focused research programs in CNS-virus interaction, fosters collaboration among more than thirteen basic science and clinical departments and centers to develop and conduct comprehensive and multidisciplinary basic to clinic research programs. For instance, through collaborative efforts with members of the Departments of Neurology and Radiology, a novel approach that includes the use of nanoparticles in imaging is under development for CNS disorders. This program has received funding from NIH. With members of the Department of Pharmacology and the Center for Substance Abuse Research (CSAR), a successful NIH-funded program project was developed based on the primate/SIV model generated by the CNV to assess cooperativity between morphine and HIV-1 in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Through collaboration with the several basic science and clinical departments, the CNV has developed a comprehensive NeuroAIDS center (CNAC) grant application that recently received $8.34 million from NIMH and can be accessed at http://www.temple.edu/medicine/departments_centers/research/CNAC/index.htm. Further, collaboration of the CNV with Infectious Diseases has led to funding of a grant application on basic and clinical AIDS. Moreover, the funded program project focusing on signaling pathways in the CNS and neurodegeneration was developed through collaboration with faculty members from the Department of Biology. Finally, with our international affiliates, the CNV received an NIH-funded program to study the mechanisms of apoptosis in viral induced CNS disease. Thus, as seen, the CNV has been extremely successful in securing several large grants, center grants, and equipment grants. The center played a key role in preparing a construction grant for establishing the Institute for Translational Neuroscience on the 8th floor of the MERB. This grant received $11.8 million dollars and the project is now complete. The center plans to focus more effort into training and initiating collaboration with clinicians in a variety of areas including neuroAIDS, brain tumors, multiple sclerosis and other viral induced CNS diseases. The synergistic collaboration between CNV and other groups of scientists in the areas of CNS infection, including those from the Department of Neuroscience, will continue to create a vibrant research and educational environment focused on viral induced neurological disorders.

 

Return to top

 

 

Cooperative Interaction of CNV with Various Departments and Centers at Temple University

 

cooperative interaction of CNV with various departments and centers at Temple University

 

Return to top