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Awards, News Briefs and Announcements

Rosario Scalia, MD, PhD, Named to Study Section

 

rosario scalia, md, phdSept. 3, 2014. Rosario Scalia, MD, PhD, has accepted an invitation to serve as a member of the Integrative Physiology of Obesity and Diabetes Study Section in the Center for Scientific Review.

Dr. Scalia is Professor of Physiology at Temple University School of Medicine, and Professor in both Temple’s Cardiovascular Research Center and Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center. Study section members are selected on the basis of the quality of their research accomplishments, publications in scientific journals, and other significant scientific activities, achievements and honors.

 

 

Temple Physician Joins Exclusive Group of Women Leaders

 

Temple Physician Joins Exclusive Group of Women Leaders

Image: Dr. Anuradha Paranjape and Dr. Larry Kaiser

 

July 11, 2014. Anuradha Paranjape, MD, MPH, FACP, Professor and Chief of General Internal Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, and Vice Chair for Faculty Development in the Department of Medicine, recently joined an exclusive group of 800 women when she graduated from the year-long Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program at Drexel University College of Medicine. ELAM is the nation’s only program dedicated to preparing women for senior leadership roles in academic health science institutions. The intensive fellowship encompasses executive education, personal leadership assessments, networking opportunities, and mentoring activities aimed at broadening perspectives, building new capacities and encouraging professional connections.

 

The fellowship concluded in April with the 2014 Leaders Forum. This capstone event, attended by Larry R. Kaiser, MD, FACS, Dean of the Temple School of Medicine and President and CEO of the Temple University Health System, featured a poster symposium highlighting the fellows' institutional action projects. These projects were initiated during the ELAM year at their home institutions, in coordination with their deans and other senior leadership, and were designed to address an institutional or departmental need or priority.

 

 

Joseph Queenan, MD, Joins Temple's Department of Neurosurgery

 

joseph queenan, mdJoseph Queenan, MD, has been appointed neurosurgeon at Temple University Hospital, and Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at Temple University School of Medicine.

 

Dr. Queenan specializes in spinal cord tumors, brain tumors, cerebrospinal fluid disorders, hydrocephalus, Chiari malformations and tethered spinal cords. He also provides care for spinal degenerative disease and has a special interest in providing adult neurosurgical care for pediatric neurosurgical patients.

 

Dr. Queenan earned his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and completed a Neurosurgery residency at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York. He later completed a fellowship in Pediatric Surgery at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York.

 

Dr. Queenan comes to Temple from Hahnemann University Hospital, where he previously served as Chief of Neurosurgery. Prior to that, he was an attending neurosurgeon at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, NJ, and Chief of Neurosurgery at Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE.

 

 

Philip Villanueva, MD, Named Director of Neurotrauma and Neurocritical Care at Temple

Philip A. Villanueva, MD, has been appointed Professor of Clinical Neurosurgery at Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of Neurotrauma and Neurocritical Care at Temple University Hospital, effective July 1, 2014.

 

Previously, Dr. Villanueva had served as Professor of Neurosurgery at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA, and Director of Neurosurgery and Critical Care at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

 

"I'm very excited to join the Temple neurosurgical team," said Dr. Villanueva. "I look forward to an active role in managing the neurotrauma patients and to working with colleagues in neurology and surgery."

 

"Dr. Villanueva's excellent surgical skills and leadership experience make him ideally suited to direct and continue to develop Temple's Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit," said Michael W. Weaver, MD, Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Temple University School of Medicine.

 

Dr. Villanueva specializes in neurocritical care and neurotrauma, including traumatic brain injury and cranial reconstruction. His research focuses on traumatic brain injury and brain oxygenation in traumatic head injury.

 

Board-certified in Neurological Surgery, Dr. Villanueva earned his Medical Degree at University of Miami School of Medicine. He went on to complete a General Surgery Internship, a Neurological Surgery Residency and a Fellowship in the Neurosurgical Care Unit at University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.

 

Dr. Villanueva is an NIH-funded investigator who has authored many peer-reviewed articles, abstracts and textbook chapters. He is among the first surgeons to be certified in Neurocritical Care by the Society of Neurological Surgeons. Dr. Villanueva is also a frequent presenter at national and international meetings and is a member of the American Brain Injury Consortium, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

 

 

Kadir Erkmen, MD, FAANS, Named Director of Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery at Temple

 

Kadir Erkmen, MD, FAANS, has been appointed Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery and the Neurosurgery Residency Program at Temple University Hospital, effective June 16, 2014.

 

Prior to coming to Temple, Dr. Erkmen had served as Assistant Professor of Surgery and Neurology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth; and the Surgical Director of the Cerebrovascular and Stroke Program, the Director of Skull Base Surgery, and the Medical Director of the Neuroscience Special Care Unit at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire. Following seven years in academic practice at Dartmouth, Dr. Erkmen trained in the new field of Endovascular Neurosurgery, recently completing a fellowship at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center.

 

"I am excited to be joining the Department of Neurosurgery at Temple," said Dr. Erkmen. "My focus and passion, both clinically and from a research standpoint, is to improve outcomes in patients with complex neurosurgical conditions. I have spent additional time training in new minimally-invasive techniques to provide my patients with the highest quality care. I look forward to collaborating with my colleagues in Neurology, Radiology, Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, and Radiation Oncology to provide those patients with the most advanced, comprehensive care available."

 

"Dr. Erkmen possesses the skills and experience to take on the most complex and challenging of neurosurgical cases, and we are extremely pleased to have him join the Temple team," said Michael W. Weaver, MD, Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Temple University School of Medicine.

 

Dr. Erkmen specializes in cerebrovascular and neuroendovascular surgery, including open and minimally-invasive treatment of cerebral aneurysms, subarachnoid hemorrhage and carotid stenosis; skull base surgery, including acoustic neuroma, skull base tumors and endonasal endoscopic skull base surgery; minimally invasive techniques in neurosurgery; and general cranial neurosurgery, including brain tumors, brain metastases and glioma. His research focuses on improving outcomes in subarachnoid hemorrhage, facial nerve outcomes in acoustic neuroma and follow-up modalities for coiled aneurysms.

 

Board-certified in Neurosurgery, Dr. Erkmen earned his Medical Degree from University of Maryland School of Medicine. He completed both a General Surgery Internship and Neurosurgery Residency at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Dr. Erkmen also completed a Research Fellowship at Boston Children's Hospital investigating the role of stem cells in the treatment of neurological conditions. He went on to complete a Fellowship in Skull Base Surgery at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and a Neuroendovascular Surgery Fellowship at University of Texas Health Sciences Center.

 

Dr. Erkmen's research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and he has authored more than 60 peer-reviewed articles, abstracts and textbook chapters. He has been on the editorial boards for the American Heart Association and the North American Skull Base Society, and has earned many awards and honors, including the National Research Service Award from the NIH. Dr. Erkmen is a regular presenter at national and international meetings and he has been a reviewer for several scientific journals, including the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and a member of the American Heart Association Stroke Council, the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the American College of Surgeons and the North American Skull Base Society.

 


Temple Orthopaedic Surgeon Travels to a Still-Recovering Haiti

 

saqib rehman, mdJune 9, 2014. Saqib Rehman, MD, Director of Orthopaedic Trauma at Temple University Hospital and Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, recently returned from his second visit to the island of Haiti – which remains the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and is still rebuilding from the devastating earthquake of 2010. A scarcity of orthopaedic surgeons, extremely limited training resources, and a massive surge of orthopaedic injuries from the earthquake continue to make orthopaedic care particularly challenging in Haiti.

"The world medical community was very well-intentioned and certainly helped many Haitians when responding to the initial disaster, but the humanitarian disaster still remains," said Dr. Rehman. "The complex problem which I have focused on is in trying to support the orthopaedic surgeons in Haiti who are left to take care of all the 'damage control' surgery that was done after the earthquake in addition to the overwhelming burden of everyday trauma and fractures."

Another unfortunate problem that Dr. Rehman is trying to assist with is proper organization, storage and distribution of the complex assortment of bone fixation implants and instruments that have been donated but remain in disorganized piles in the corners of hospitals, rendered essentially useless.

Dr. Rehman, who officially traveled as a representative from the Foundation for Orthopaedic Trauma, hopes that his position as Chairman of the Humanitarian Committee of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association will help him facilitate continued support for his colleagues in Haiti, including education, skills training, technical support and direct patient care.

"It truly puts things in perspective when you see what our Haitian colleagues are doing with extremely limited resources and training," he said. "It's hard not to try and help them in any meaningful way we can."

 


Orthopaedic Surgery Resident Research Day 2014

 

Resident Research Day 2014

Image (left to right): Scott Barbash, MD, James Lachman, MD, Frank Liporace, MD (visiting professor/guest judge), Richard Tosti, MD

 

Temple's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery held its annual Resident Research Day on Saturday April 26, 2014, showcasing the investigative research talents of Temple's orthopaedic residents. Frank Liporace, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at New York University, gave the keynote lecture and served as a guest judge for the presentations.

 

First Place went to James Lachman, MD, PGY2, for his biomechanical investigation of meniscal repair techniques used to treat knee injuries. His project, a collaboration between Temple's Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Mechanical Engineering, found that there was no significant difference between newer, more expensive technologies and current suture methods for their particular injury model.

 

Second Place went to Richard Tosti, MD, PGY-4 for his work entitled "Emerging multi drug resistance in hand infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)." His group found that increasing bacterial resistance to commonly-used antibiotics may warrant new approaches to antibiotic treatment of hand infections. Dr. Tosti's work was also selected for publication in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

 

Third Place went to Scott Barbash, MD, PGY-5, for his work entitled "Optimal differentiation of tissue types using combined mid- and near- infrared spectroscopy," done in collaboration with the Department of Bioengineering at Temple. The project showcased an IR spectroscopy technique to verify the successful transplantation of tendon grafts to repair anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears.

 


Temple Scientists Research How Human DNA Changes Over Time

 

jean-pierre issa, md

 

Jean-Pierre Issa, MD, Director of the Fels Intitute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology and Professor of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, is investigating how human DNA is altered over time. A number of the Institute's research projects are exploring how lifestyle impacts epigenetics, the process by which cells that contain the same DNA are differentiated, and how epigenetics affects wellness.

 

“Our body is made of one genetic code, one sequence of DNA,” Dr. Issa said. “But within that code are epigenetic marks—a series of tags that can differentiate what type of tissue that DNA will form. If you consider DNA the book of life, you can think of those tags as bookmarks.”

 

Learn more about this research: http://www.temple.edu/templemag/2014_spring/gamechangers.html

 

 

Temple Hosts First Visitors from Renji Hospital

 

Temple's Joseph Cheung, MD, PhD, and JuFang Wang, MD, (far left and left respectively) talk to three of the visiting healthcare professionals from Renji Hospital in the Temple CICU. Pictured right is CICU Nurse Manager Bob Burke.

Temple's Joseph Cheung, MD, PhD, and JuFang Wang, MD, (far left and left respectively) talk to three of the visiting healthcare professionals from Renji Hospital in the Temple CICU. Pictured right is CICU Nurse Manager Bob Burke.

 

April 15, 2014. A handful of healthcare professionals from China got a first-hand look at the American medical system thanks to a partnership between Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM) and Renji Hospital in Shanghai, China.

 

In February, four visitors from Renji Hospital—including an ENT surgeon, a CICU nurse, a robotic surgery nurse, and a liver transplant nurse—came to Temple to observe various areas of the hospital and medical school. The four are part of the first exchange between the two institutions since Larry Kaiser, MD, FACS, Dean of TUSM and President and Chief Executive Officer of Temple University Health System, signed a partnership agreement in April 2013 for collaborative educational and research programs with the president of Renji Hospital, one of the two largest teaching hospitals associated with Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in Shanghai.

 

According to one of the Chinese visitors, the exchange provided a unique opportunity to compare the American and Chinese healthcare systems.

 

"A big difference is the relationship that is shared between physicians and patients in the United States," said Jiping Li, MD, PhD, an ear, nose and throat surgeon at Renji Hospital. "In China, we see many patients in one day and do not have the time to interact with them or get to know them very well.

 

"I have also been impressed with how Temple's operating room is managed," he continued. "It is very organized and logical, and I have had the chance to observe many different ways to perform surgery."

 

Liuyun Yu is a cardiology nurse in China. At Temple, she has spent a month observing in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit. She has also observed procedures in the catheterization and electrophysiology labs.

 

"I have learned a lot about technology that we don't have in China, including the Tandem heart device and left ventricular assist devices," she said.

 

"Our goal with this partnership is to establish a major Temple Health presence in Shanghai," said Joseph Cheung, MD, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine at TUSM.

 

 

Temple's Darilyn V. Moyer, MD, FACP, Elected Chair of Board of Governors of National Doctors' Group

 

darilyn moyer, mdDarilyn V. Moyer, MD, FACP, has been named Chair of the Board of Governors of the American College of Physicians (ACP), the nation's largest medical specialty organization. Dr. Moyer's term will begin at the conclusion of Internal Medicine 2014, ACP's annual scientific meeting in Orlando, FL, April 10-12.

 

Dr. Moyer is currently serving as Chair-elect of the Board of Governors of the College, and Governor of ACP's Pennsylvania Southeastern Chapter. Governors are elected by local ACP members and serve four-year terms. Her term as Governor of the Pennsylvania Southeastern Chapter will end at Internal Medicine 2014. Working with a local council, they supervise ACP chapter activities, appoint members to local committees, and preside at regional meetings. They also represent members by serving on the ACP Board of Governors. She has been a Fellow of the ACP (FACP) since 1995. FACP is an honorary designation that recognizes ongoing individual service and contributions to the practice of medicine.

 

She is a Professor of Medicine, Vice Chair for Education in the Department of Medicine, Internal Medicine Residency Program Director, and Assistant Dean for Graduate Medical Education at Temple University School of Medicine.

Dr. Moyer is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, and is enrolled in Maintenance of Certification.

 

She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in the Biological Basis of Behavior, Biology and Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and attended medical school at Temple University School of Medicine. She completed her Internal Medicine Residency at Temple University Hospital and served as a Chief Resident/Clinical Instructor of Medicine. She went on to complete an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA.

 

Dr. Moyer is on the faculty in the Department of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine and is an active practitioner in primary care, HIV and Infectious Diseases. She received the Temple University School of Medicine Women in Medicine Mentoring Award in 2012.

 

Her research and scholarly activity interests and presentations include those in the medical education, high value care, patient safety, professionalism and digital media and HIV/Infectious Diseases realm. She is the Co-Faculty Advisor for the Temple University School of Medicine Internal Medicine Interest Group and for the Temple University School of Medicine Student Educating About Healthcare Policy group.

 

 

Longtime Temple Faculty Member Ronald J. Tallarida, PhD, Honored With Portrait

 

ronald j tallarida phd

Ronald Tallarida, PhD, with his portrait and award-winning portrait artist, Ellen Cooper, a graduate of Temple’s Tyler School of Art.

 

March 20, 2014. On March 17, colleagues, former students, family, and friends gathered for the presentation of the portrait of Ronald J. Tallarida, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology, to recognize his nearly five decades of dedicated service to the School of Medicine and University.

 

Dr. Tallarida is widely regaled for his unique expertise in theoretical and quantitative pharmacology – and beloved by scores of colleagues and former students. Many came from Arizona, Florida, Connecticut, and New York for the event.

 

“Had it been held on the moon, I would have made a point of being there,” said Mark Watson, PhD ’82, a former student and New York-based consultant, who served as master of ceremonies for the event.

 

Following a welcome from Larry Kaiser, MD, Dean and Temple Health CEO, Dr. Watson sang Dr. Tallarida’s praises as a teacher and mentor – then others joined in. TUSM Board of Visitors member Leonard Jacob, MD, PhD ’75, Chairman of Antares Pharmaceuticals, lauded his professional contributions. Gerry Sterling, PhD, TUSM’s Senior Associate Dean for Education, celebrated his contributions to teaching. Audrey Uknis, MD, TUSM’s Senior Associate Dean for Admissions and Strategy, highlighted his contributions to service. Robert Raffa, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology at Temple’s School of Pharmacy, showcased his impact on students.

 

“Dr. Tallarida’s former students now have such titles as CEO, Department Chair, Research Director, and Company Founder,” said Dr. Raffa. “They are responsible for 20 patents, more than $50 million in research grants, 1,000+ scientific articles, and 30 marketed drugs. They have helped thousands of patients. Dr. Tallarida taught them to apply knowledge and share it. In this way, the beat goes on. The Tallarida legacy perpetuates.”

 

In addition to teaching cardiovascular pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and drug-receptor theory to medical, dental, and podiatry students, Dr. Tallarida is a senior investigator in Temple's Center for Substance Abuse Research and co-director of its core on integrative pharmacology. His work, which has been applied to studies of blood vessel contractility, opioid receptors, and drug interactions, is represented in more than 250 articles and eight textbooks. He also holds three U.S. patents.

 

The speakers also celebrated Dr. Tallarida’s devotion to professional affairs, both inside Temple and outside. The former president of Temple’s Medical Faculty Senate and Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs was once also President of the Mid-Atlantic Pharmacology Society. His honors include the George B. Koelle Award of the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and the Lindback Award for distinguished teaching.

 

“Ron Tallarida is a true gentleman and scholar,” said Dr. Uknis. “His commitment has been complete and broad-based.”

 

In 1967, Dr. Tallarida earned his PhD in pharmacology at TUSM as an NIH fellow. He was offered a faculty position and never left. He has been plying his trade ever since.

 

“I have been so very fortunate,” said Dr. Tallarida, grateful to all who came to see him honored. “I keep asking myself the same question I asked nearly 50 years ago: How could a job be this good?”

 

 

Alisa Peet, MD, Elected to National Council in Medical Education

 

alisa peet, md

 

March 12, 2014. Alisa Peet, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Temple University School of Medicine’s Internal Medicine Clerkship, has been elected to the National Council of Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine (CDIM).


Founded in 1989, CDIM promotes excellence in the education of medical students in internal medicine by establishing guidelines for curriculum, evaluation, research, administration, and career development for medical schools and teaching hospitals in Canada and the United States.


Dr. Peet was elected to serve on the CDIM in recognition of her seasoned understanding of the issues relevant to medical education. She has experienced the process at Temple from multiple perspectives: as a medical student (TUSM, Class of 2000), an internal medicine resident (Temple University Hospital, chief resident, June 2003-04), and now as a faculty member.


During the past decade that she has directed Temple’s internal medicine clerkship, Dr. Peet has overseen the internal medicine curriculum, working with the directors of Temple’s seven statewide internal medicine clinical teaching sites to ensure that curricular objectives are met. She is supportive of students and faculty – and enthusiastic about serving on the CDIM.


“I want to help the CDIM create approaches to education that will enable trainees to thrive,” she said, noting that she wants to find ways to incorporate the ideas of students and faculty.


“After all,” she said, “they are the ones on the front line.”


Dr. Peet’s three-year appointment as a CDIM councilor begins on July 1, 2014.

 

 

Medical Students “Stick it” to Each Other

 

student acupuncture day

Sanjana Luther (right) inserts a small acupuncture needle into the hand of fellow second-year medical student Jay Naik

 

March 5, 2014. With equal parts trepidation and excitement, nearly 50 second-year Temple medical students pair off and begin gently inserting small needles into each other’s scalps, hands and feet. That was the scene at the Student Acupuncture Workshop, held Jan. 23 in recognition of International Integrative Medicine Day.

 

The workshop gave students a hands-on introduction to a treatment that is only briefly touched upon in their curriculum. It was led by medical acupuncturists Karen Lin, MD, and Mary van den Berg-Wolf, MD, physicians in Temple’s Section of General Internal Medicine, and co-sponsored by the Temple Integrative Medicine Student Group and the Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association.

 

“These students will be practicing medicine in a few years, and their patients will ask them about alternative and complementary therapies like acupuncture,” said Dr. Lin, who directs the Acupuncture Program at TUH. “Even if they don’t offer the therapy themselves, they should have a familiarity and general understanding of its use so they can discuss it with their patients.”

 

The workshop began with an overview of acupuncture and its history. Although it has been practiced for thousands of years in Asia, the therapy didn’t enter the American mainstream consciousness until the early 1970s. The 1990s saw a big uptick in acceptance when the National Institutes of Health established an Office of Alternative Medicine and the FDA approved acupuncture needles as a medical device.

 

Following the presentation and instruction on how and where to place the flexible, hair-thin needles, students paired up to try their hand at inserting them. For many of the students, this was their first exposure to acupuncture.

 

“I came to this workshop because I’ve always been interested in different ways of healing, and the influence of other cultures on medicine,” said participant Adam Lipsom.

 

According to Casey Meizinger, a fourth-year medical student and President of the Temple Integrative Medicine Student Group, the acupuncture workshop helps “fill in the gaps” of the regular medical school curriculum.

 

“We started this group because integrative medicine is growing,” she said. “Our intent is to introduce students to other forms of healing and expose them to what therapies exist outside of traditional Western medicine.”

 

 

Temple Scientists Research Stem Cells as Treatment for Degenerative Diseases

 

Pediatric Brain on a Chip
Image from National Institutes of Health

 

January 30, 2014.  While stem cells have been used to treat blood cancers for years, Temple researchers are now investigating the use of stem cells to combat other diseases as well. Steven R. Houser, PhD, FAHA, Chair of the Department of Physiology, Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center, and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Physiology; Ausim S. Azizi, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurology; and Jon George, MD, Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Cardiovascular Research Center, are conducting groundbreaking research that could provide physicians with new ways to heal heart tissue damaged by heart attacks, improve the brain function of stroke patients, and reverse the effects of Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Learn more about this research: http://www.temple.edu/templemag/2014_winter/stemcells.html

 

Temple Neuroscientists and Engineers Recreate ‘Pediatric Brain on a Chip’ for the Purpose of Studying Neurological Diseases

 

Pediatric Brain on a Chip
Image from Temple Department of Mechanical Engineering Chair Mohammad Kiani, PhD, FAHA.

 

December 4, 2013. Funded by a three-year, $600,000 grant from Shriners Hospitals for Children, Barbara Krynska, MS, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center at Temple University School of Medicine, and Mohammad Kiani, PhD, FAHA, Chair of Mechanical Engineering at Temple University, are leading the development of a pediatric blood-brain barrier system on a chip. This initiative will offer great potential for studying the role of the blood-brain barrier in pediatric neurological diseases and testing the blood-brain-barrier permeability of various therapeutic drugs.


Learn more about this research: http://news.temple.edu/news/2013-12-02/recreating-pediatric-brain-chip-could-enhance-study-diseases


 

Temple Hosts APSA Regional Meeting

 

At the APSA conference (L-R): Isha Srivastava, event co-chair and MD-PhD candidate; Lindsey Gerngross, MD-PhD candidate and poster competition winner; Evan Noch, MD-PhD 12, APSA President and Temple alumnus; and Kaitlin Collura, MD-PhD candidate and event co-chair
Image: At the APSA conference (L-R): Isha Srivastava, event co-chair and MD-PhD candidate; Lindsey Gerngross, MD-PhD candidate and poster competition winner; Evan Noch, MD-PhD ’12, APSA President and Temple alumnus; and Kaitlin Collura, MD-PhD candidate and event co-chair.

 

November 7, 2013. On November 2, Temple University School of Medicine hosted the 7th annual northeast regional meeting of the American Physician Scientists Association (APSA), a national organization devoted to meeting the career-development needs of future physician-scientists.

 

The day-long event, which drew more than 160 attendees from seven states, featured four keynote addresses, a poster session and competition showcasing more than 30 student research projects, and small- group discussion sessions devoted to 11 different topics.

 

In his keynote address, which launched the conference, Arthur M. Feldman, MD, PhD, Executive Dean of Temple University School of Medicine and Chief Academic Officer of Temple University Health System, gave the future physician-scientists six essential tips for constructing a supportive framework for their lives and careers. Three additional talks, interspersed throughout the day, were made by Susan Morgello, MD, of Mount Sinai Medical Center (NY), and Stephen Ostroff, MD, and Carol Weiss, MD-PhD, both of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 

Lindsey Gerngross, an MD-PhD candidate at Temple, won a prize in the poster competition for her presentation of research targeting a specific monocyte subset for the prevention and treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Two students from Thomas Jefferson University and Drexel University College of Medicine won prizes as well.

 

Eight Temple faculty members led group discussion sessions and/or judged the poster session: Philip Cohen, MD (Rheumatology); James Heckman, PhD (Physiology); John Krouse, MD (Otolaryngology); Curtis Miyamoto, MD (Radiation Oncology); Darilyn Moyer, MD (Internal Medicine); Stephen Permut, MD, JD, (Family and Community Medicine) Scott Shore, PhD (Biochemistry); and Dianne Soprano, PhD (Biochemistry).

 

“This was the perfect meeting for MD/PhD students, medical students interested in research/academic pathways, PhD students interested in medical school–even undergraduate students interested in physician-scientist degree programs,” said Temple alumnus Evan Noch, MD, PhD, the President of APSA and a first-year neurology resident at Weill-Cornell Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York. “I was proud to see my alma mater host the event and do such a great job.”

 

Isha Srivastava and Kaitlyn Collura, MD-PhD candidates at Temple, co-chaired the organizing committee for the event, which was sponsored by APSA, Temple, Drexel University School of Medicine, and Thomas Jefferson University, with additional support from the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Temple Researcher Awarded NIH Grant for Pioneering Oral Cancer Research

 

Oneida A. Arosarena, MD, FACS (standing), with Senior Lab Supervisor Roshanak Razmpour
Image: Oneida A. Arosarena, MD, FACS (standing) with Senior Lab Super visor Roshanak Razmpour

 

October 30, 2013. The spread of oral cancer into bone tissue can be extremely painful and distressing for patients, since it is a sign of advanced disease. The condition affects about 10 to 30 percent of oral cancer patients; but in minority populations, where access to health care may be lacking, the incidence can be much higher. To add to doctors’ concerns, there are few drugs capable of treating oral bone invasion, a situation that has inspired a hunt for biological molecules linked to the disease that could serve as targets for new therapeutic agents.

 

One of the leaders in that effort is Oneida A. Arosarena, MD, FACS, Associate Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at the Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM). Dr. Arosarena recently was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to spearhead a preliminary investigation into osteoactivin, a potential drug target for bone invasion in oral cancer.

 

In previous work, Dr. Arosarena determined that osteoactivin is active in oral cancer and found that it is expressed to varying degrees in different types of oral cancer cells. Cells that had significantly elevated osteoactivin levels came from highly aggressive oral tumors, the ones most likely to undergo bone invasion.

 

The finding suggested that osteoactivin could be more than a drug target – and that it could serve as an indicator, or marker, of aggressive forms of oral cancer. In theory, then, the assessment of osteoactivin levels could help identify patients with high osteoactivinexpressing tumors and thereby allow for earlier treatment. Oral cancer in its earliest stages is a curable disease.

 

 

Temple Medical Physicists Internationally Recognized for Research

 

Members of Temple's Radiation Oncology Department who presented at the Science Council session

Image: Members of Temple's Radiation Oncology Department who presented at the Science Council session, (left to right): Vladimir Valakh, MD; Pierre Charpentier, MS; Shidong Li, PhD; Philip Chan, MS; and Curtis Miyamoto, MD. Not pictured: Toni Neicu, PhD, and Bizhan Micaily, MD.

 

October 21, 2013.Under the direction of Shidong Li, PhD, Temple University Hospital (TUH) Medical Physicists presented their latest research findings during the 2013 Science Council Session at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine's annual meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana. Temple's presenters hosted a two-hour seminar entitled, Multi-Modality Imaging in Radiation Oncology: Planning, Guidance, and Assessment of Treatment Response.

 

"We were truly honored to have the opportunity to present our findings to a group of the best physicists and physicians in the world," said Dr. Li, Temple University Hospital's Chief Medical Physicist.

 

"Our presentation described a new approach in Cone-beam-CT guidance to measure and track early-stage lung cancer nodules with great accuracy during radiation therapy. A patient's body and its internal organs are constantly shifting during therapy due to breathing, and our approach combined with a 4D optical monitoring system, currently under clinical testing, is able to monitor the patient's position in real-time – allowing us to position the radiation beam so that it remains precisely focused on the tumor, avoiding healthy tissue. In the coming months, we are looking to publish a paper to describe our findings in greater detail," Dr. Li added

 

Temple’s Domenico Praticò, MD, Receives Gift from the Alzheimer's Association to Fund Future Investigations

 

Domenico Praticò, MDOctober 15, 2013. Two years ago, when Temple researcher Domenico Praticò, MD, shared some of his earlier findings and ongoing hypotheses about the causes of Alzheimer's Disease at a community meeting sponsored by the Alzheimer's Association, he had no idea that his unflagging passion for finding a cure for the disease would inspire one member of that audience to ultimately bequeath $350,000 to fund his future investigations.

 

"At the time, I didn't realize that my talk about our research would result in this generous gift," said Dr. Praticò, Professor of Pharmacology and Microbiology and Immunology at Temple University School of Medicine. Dr. Praticò learned later that his anonymous benefactor had watched her father deteriorate and die from the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease.

 

A review of Dr. Praticò's groundbreaking and promising work helps explain why his benefactor chose to support his research. In a prior study funded by the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Praticò and his team were the first in the world to identify a protein in the brain (12/15-Lipoxygenase) that, when produced excessively, leads to the development of plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Their significant work, which documented the biochemical chain-reaction set-off by the protein, was published in the Annals of Neurology in 2012.

 

The researchers' dual discoveries also set the stage for the next phase of their work – which would focus on blocking the excessive production of the protein, thereby preventing the creation of Alzheimer's–related plaques.

 

"If excessive 12/15-Lipoxygenase can be blocked, perhaps Alzheimer's can be thwarted," suggests Dr. Praticò. Most recently, the scientists have identified two compounds that appear to be most promising in blocking or modulating the expression of 12/15-Lipoxygenase.

 

Using animal models, Dr. Praticò's lab is currently testing the ability of the compounds to both inhibit the development of the disease and inhibit its growth once the tell-tale signs of Alzheimer's have been detected.

 

"Alzheimer's is a disease that steals from us what makes us human – our memories, our cognitive abilities," Dr. Praticò says softly. "We have learned a tremendous amount about it in the last decade or so, but we still have a long way to go … and research is the way we forge ahead."

 

Not only will the $350,000 unrestricted gift help fund Dr. Praticò's current investigations, but, due to a dollar-for-dollar "matching" stipulation in his benefactor's will, it has the potential to double the funds available to support his work.

 

"I am extremely grateful for the wonderful gift we have received – which gives us the freedom to explore new avenues of research that, if successful, will be highly rewarding," adds Dr. Praticò.

 

Make a donation to Temple's Alzheimer's Research Fund by visiting http://giving.temple.edu/alzheimer.

 

Temple's John Krouse, MD, PhD, Appointed Editor-Elect of National Otolaryngology Journal

 

John H. Krouse, MD, PhDOctober 10, 2013. John H. Krouse, MD, PhD, Professor and Chairman of Temple's Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Associate Dean of Graduate Medical Education at Temple University School of Medicine, has been named the incoming Editor-in-Chief of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, the official, peer-reviewed journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). The AAO-HNS Foundation works to promote the advancement of the art, science and ethical practice of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery through education, research and lifelong learning.

 

Dr. Krouse will assume his new position on October 1, 2014, succeeding Richard M. Rosenfeld, MD, MPH, Professor and Chairman of Otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in New York. Presently, Dr. Krouse serves as an Associate Editor for the journal—a position he has held for the past seven years.

 

"I am the first to recognize the sizable shoes that I must fill by having the honor and privilege of succeeding Dr. Rosenfeld as editor-in-chief of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery," said Dr. Krouse. "I look forward to ensuring that Oto-HNS remains the primary source for dissemination of clinical and scientific knowledge in our broad specialty."

 

Dr. Krouse is board-certified in otolaryngology and specializes in rhinology and allergy. He has contributed to more than 125 articles in various publications, several book chapters and five textbooks. Additionally, he has presented numerous papers at national and international meetings.

 

His research interests include allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, local nasal immunity, chronic rhinosinusitis, endoscopic sinus surgery, asthma and sleep.

 

 

Temple's Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Earns Clinical Research Award from International Forum for the Study of Itch

 

gil yosipovitch, mdOctober 2, 2013. Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine, has been named the first-ever recipient of the Dr. Jeffrey D. Bernhard
Award by the International Forum for the Study of Itch. Dr. Yosipovitch received the award at the recent
World Congress on Itch in Boston, MA.

 

The award will be given out every two years to a recipient who demonstrates outstanding contributions to clinical research in the field of itch. The winner of the award is also asked to deliver the Bernhard Distinguished Lecture at the World Congress of Itch.

 

Dr. Yosipovitch is an internationally recognized leader in the clinical aspects of itch, and is a renowned clinician and investigator into the causes and treatments of complex skin diseases – including eczema, psoriasis, and diseases of other organ systems with skin manifestations.

 

In addition to being Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine, Dr. Yosipovitch is also leading the dermatologic program at Fox Chase Cancer Center, and is directing the development of a dedicated Center for Itch on Temple's Health Sciences Campus.

 

 

Former Fels Institute for Cancer Research Director Honored

 

Dr. Reddy Portrait

Image: Dr. Larry Kaiser with Dr. Reddy and his portrait, painted by Joseph Routon.

 

October 1, 2013. On September 27, Temple University School of Medicine presented a day-long symposium to honor E. Premkumar Reddy, PhD, the internationally recognized scientist who headed The Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology at Temple for 18 years, from 1992 to 2010. Today Reddy serves as Director of Experimental Cancer Therapeutics at Mt. Sinai University School of Medicine in New York, and continues to have a significant voice in molecular oncology.


Nine of Dr. Reddy’s longtime colleagues, from high-profile organizations such as the National Institutes of Health and our very own Fox Chase Cancer Center, spoke on cancer biology topics near and dear to Dr. Reddy’s heart -- and peppered the science with personal anecdotes.


Dr. Reddy, too, addressed the admiring crowd of former colleagues and students. He thanked them for hosting the event – then traced the history of rigosertib, a novel anti-cancer therapeutic that he developed at Temple. This innovative drug has proven effective in clinical trials for myelodysplastic syndromes, pancreatic cancer, and other cancers -- and could soon be approved by the FDA.


“This is a great gathering for a great scientist and a great man – and we thank Prem for all he did for the Fels Institute and Temple University,” said Larry Kaiser, MD, FACS, who presided over what, for many, was the highlight of the event: the presentation of Dr. Reddy’s portrait to the School of Medicine. The portrait will hang in the Fels Institute, alongside those of its other past directors.


“The Fels Institute, now headed by the noted epigeneticist Jean Pierre Issa, MD, was founded in 1933. Its mission is to advance understanding of cancer – and to develop new therapies for treatment. Fels has played a critical role in the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in the field. It was the longtime home of the American Association for Cancer Research and the journals Cancer Research and Oncogene. Dr. Reddy edited the latter until 2010.


In addition to editing Oncogene during his Fels directorship, Dr. Reddy recruited outstanding faculty, educated 22 PhD students, and conducted important research. Thomson Reuters named Dr. Reddy one of the 250 most highly cited researchers from 2000–2012. His seminal discoveries provided a clear understanding of the molecular basis of cancer, and elucidated the process by which several different cellular proto-oncogenes produce cancer-causing viral oncogenes.


The day’s distinguished lecturers were Stuart Aaronson, MD (Founding Chair, Icahn School of Medicine, Mt. Sinai University); Wafik El-Deiry, MD, PhD (Interim Director, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute; Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Biology and Therapy); Meenhard Herlyn, DVM, DSc (Director, Wistar Institute Melanoma Research Center); George Prendergast, PhD (President, Lankenau Institute for Medical Research; Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Research); Sushil Rane, PhD (Chief, Cell Growth and Metabolism Section, National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases); Anna Maria Skalka, PhD (W.W. Smith Chair in Cancer Research, Fox Chase Cancer Center); National Academy of Sciences member George Vande Woude, PhD (Head, Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Van Andel Research Institute); and Ramesh Kumar, PhD (President/CEO, Onconova Therapeutics, Inc.).

Welcoming Biomedical Sciences Graduate Students – and Visiting Students from Brazil

 

2013 Biomedical Sciences Entering Class

New biomedical sciences students – and four visiting students from Brazil along with Dianne Soprano, PhD, Associate Dean (far left), and Scott Shore, PhD, Associate Dean (far right).

 

August 29, 2013. The Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM) Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program welcomes 24 new students, plus four visiting students from Brazil.

 

Seventeen of the degree-program students are doctoral (PhD) candidates, and seven are pursuing a Master’s degree. Temple was once again successful in attracting international students to the program (six, who hail from Chile, China, and Turkey) and four American students representing ethnicities considered underrepresented in science and medicine.

 

TUSM’s biomedical graduate students can choose among five different concentrations: cancer biology and genetics; infectious disease and immunity; molecular and cellular biosciences; neuroscience; and organ systems and translational medicine.

 

“Our students are expertly prepared for roles in academia, government, and industry,” says Dianne Soprano, PhD, Associate Dean of Graduate and MD/PhD Programs, “They receive outstanding mentoring from our faculty – all premier researchers with national and international reputations.”

 

The visiting students are part of the Brazil Scientific Mobility program, a Brazilian government-sponsored initiative that gives Brazilian medical and university students the opportunity to take basic science courses and gain research experience in the United States prior to completing their degrees in Brazil.

 

 

Domenico Praticò, MD, Honored by Alzheimer’s Art Quilt Initiative

 

Dr. Pratico and Dr. Chu

Dr. Domenico Praticò (left) and Dr. Jin Chu (right) with Mrs. Jannett Caldwell of the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative.

 

August 26, 2013. On August 22, representatives of the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative® (AAQI) visited Temple University School of Medicine for two reasons: To present a past AAQI grant recipient, Domenico Praticò, MD, Professor of Pharmacology and Microbiology and Immunology, with an award for his commitment to Alzheimer's disease research – and to present a new research grant to his colleague Jin Chu, PhD, Assistant Scientist in Dr. Praticò's laboratory.

 

In 2012, Dr. Praticò was awarded a $60,000 grant from the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative (AAQI) to investigate the role that psychological stress plays in the development of Alzheimer's disease. He used it in combination with funding from the National Institutes of Health to examine how increased stress hormone levels accelerate the development of Alzheimer's disease. The ultimate objective of the research is to identify the mechanisms that trigger this effect so that therapeutic strategies can be developed.

 

"When the levels of the stress hormone corticosteroid are too high for too long, they can damage or cause the death of neuronal cells, which are very important for learning and memory," Dr. Praticò said.

 

In the course of the study, Dr. Praticò found that that high levels of corticosteroid activate a protein called 5-lipoxygenase that damage the synapse, resulting in memory and learning impairment, key symptoms for Alzheimer's. The research, published in the journal Aging Cell, documents what Dr. Praticò calls "evidence of the earliest type of damage that precedes memory deficit in Alzheimer's patients."

"This is strong support for the hypothesis that if you block 5-lipoxygenase, you can probably block the negative effects of corticosteroid in the brain," Dr. Praticò added.

 

In addition to honoring Dr. Praticò for his contributions to Alzheimer's Research, the AAQI honored Dr. Praticò for serving as a volunteer member of its Scientific Advisory Board.

 

The AAQI's new grant, awarded to Dr. Chu, is titled "Five Lipoxygenase and Alzheimer's Related Tau Pathology." This funding will enable her to unravel new lipid signaling pathways that control the formation and metabolism of the tau protein, whose accumulation in the brain, together with the amyloid-beta, is considered the main culprit for the development of Alzheimer's disease.

 

The AAQI, based in Burton, Michigan, is a national, grassroots charity that raises awareness of Alzheimer's disease and funds promising research. The AAQI auctions and sells donated quilts and sponsors a nationally touring exhibit of quilts about Alzheimer's.

 

 

 

Temple's Selwyn Rogers, Jr., MD, MPH, FACS, Earns Minority Business Leader Award

 

Selwyn O. Rogers, MD, MPH, FACSAugust 8, 2013. Selwyn O. Rogers, Jr., MD, MPH, FACS, Surgeon-in-Chief of Temple University Health System, and Professor and Chair of the Department of Surgery at Temple University School of Medicine, has been named a "Minority Business Leader" at the 2013 Minority Business Leader Awards, sponsored by the Philadelphia Business Journal. Dr. Rogers accepted his award at a breakfast ceremony on Thursday, August 8, at the Crystal Tea Room in Philadelphia.

 

The Minority Business Leader Awards recognize executives with ethnic backgrounds who also play a strong leadership role outside their jobs and serve in industry associations or community organizations.


An internationally renowned academic surgeon, teacher, mentor, researcher, administrator and innovator in community service, Dr. Rogers joined Temple in July 2012 to direct the future growth of the Department of Surgery at Temple University School of Medicine. Dr. Rogers has published dozens of research articles on health care disparities and the effect of race and ethnicity on surgical outcomes.

 

Dr. Rogers has a deep-rooted commitment to caring for the customarily underserved and to increasing the number of minority physicians in this country, especially in the area of surgery. To that end, he regularly speaks to undergraduate students and encourages them to chase their dreams no matter how big they are. He also serves as a role model and mentor for both minority and majority students and young surgeons at Temple.

 

 

Celebrating the Temple University Hospital Auxiliary's Essential Support


Celebrating the Temple University Auxiliary's half million dollar gift
Image: Celebrating the Auxiliary's half million dollar gift to the Mary F. and John M. Daly Ambulatory Surgical Center (left to right): Rosemary Nolan, Chief Operating Officer; John Kastanis, CEO; Mary McNamara, Auxiliary President; and Libbi Guy, Auxiliary President Elect.

 

August 6, 2013. Officials of Temple University Hospital and the Temple University Hospital Auxiliary recently gathered to celebrate the completion of the Auxiliary's half million-dollar pledge to the Mary F. and John M. Daly Ambulatory Surgical center at Temple University Hospital. Theirs was the lead gift in the funding that made the facility possible.

 

"Each year, the Auxiliary selects a focal point for its philanthropy," said Mary McNamara, Auxiliary President. "For several reasons the surgery center was the ideal choice for 2011."

 

First, a new ambulatory surgery center was a capital priority for the hospital. The spacious, modern and beautifully appointed new center features four surgical suites that Temple surgeons use for cases ranging from minor surgeries to more complex laparoscopic procedures.

 

Further, naming the gift enabled the Auxiliary to honor two important people: Mary Daly, a beloved Auxilian who passed away in 2011, and her surviving husband, John M. Daly, MD, emeritus dean of Temple University School of Medicine – a surgeon and a graduate of Temple’s medical school.

 

"The Auxiliary has been a tremendous asset to Temple for nearly 60 years, and we never take for granted the important role it has played in the life of this institution," said John Kastanis, FACHE, President and CEO of Temple University Hospital. "With philanthropy and capital funding so competitive in today's economy, the Auxiliary's support is more important than ever before."

 

Since its founding in 1944, the Auxiliary has provided more than $5 million in support for Temple University Hospital, raising money by conducting sales, fund raisers and social gatherings throughout year. New members are welcome. For more information, contact Rita G. Brouwer-Ancher at 215-707-4898.


 

Temple University School of Medicine Announces New Center for Metabolic Disease Research

 

Hong Wang, MD, PhD, EMBAJuly 26, 2013. Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM) has launched a new Center for Metabolic Disease Research, which is committed to performing basic and clinical research identifying specific causes of metabolic diseases, and to discovering novel therapies for these diseases.

 

“Metabolic disease research is one of the major targeted areas for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and TUSM leadership has responded to this call by designating it as one of the school’s four key research focus areas, along with cardiovascular, neuroscience, and cancer research,” said Arthur M. Feldman, MD, PhD, Executive Dean, TUSM and Chief Academic Officer, Temple University Health System. “Establishing a Center for Metabolic Disease Research is strategically important and timely because we will simultaneously carry out TUSM’s research mission, remain consistent with the NIH’s research focus, and reflect the national trend of interdisciplinary and translational health-related research,” Dr. Feldman added.

 

Metabolic disorders – which occur when abnormal chemical reactions disrupt the body’s ability to convert food to energy – can cause serious dysfunctions in the blood vessels, heart, liver, brain, and other organs. Metabolic dysfunctions have been recognized to be important mechanisms underlying diabetes and many other diseases, such as cardiovascular, endocrine, kidney, genetic, bone, and immune diseases.

 

“Temple’s Center for Metabolic Disease Research will develop interdisciplinary and translational research programs focused on metabolic diseases such as hyperlipidemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, hyperglycemia, obesity, uremia and metabolic syndrome.  Our research will study the biochemical, molecular, cellular, and pathological changes that take place before the onset of these diseases and during the course of these diseases,” said TUSM Associate Dean of Research Hong Wang, MD, PhD, EMBA, who has been named the Founding Director of the new Center. Dr. Wang is also Professor in Temple University School of Medicine’s Department of Pharmacology, Independence Blue Cross Cardiovascular Research Center, and Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center.

 

As a world-renowned and nationally-recognized leader for the pioneering research in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), a significant and independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, Dr. Wang has extensive expertise and high-profile publications in the areas of cardiovascular inflammation, atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, vascular function, molecular mechanism, and signal transduction. Dr. Wang’s research focuses on identifying biochemical mechanisms of vascular disease and discovering therapeutic targets and novel therapeutic strategies. Dr. Wang is the principal investigator on several active NIH-funded Research Project Grant Program (R01) studies.


“It takes a multidisciplinary team of researchers to study the mechanisms of complex metabolic disease,” said Dr. Wang. “We have developed active collaboration with faculty from several other TUSM research centers and departments, as well as Fox Chase Cancer Center. We welcome TUSM’s faculty members who share an interest in finding the cures for metabolic disorders for collaboration in our new Center in metabolic disease research,” she noted.

 

“Our Center is also employing multidisciplinary approaches for drug discovery, for example, metabolite identification (the chemical fingerprints that specific cellular metabolic processes leave behind), metabolomic screening, next-generation sequencing, proteomics, and high-throughput drug screening to discover new therapeutic targets and identify drug leads,” noted Dr. Wang.

 

Temple’s Center for Metabolic Disease Research has established a human tissue repository to collect plasma, blood, vessel tissue, and fat tissue samples from patients with a variety of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, and it will also test novel therapeutics in human metabolic disease-related chronic tissue ischemia using cell and gene therapy approaches.

 

“We are confident that our Center will grow and become one of the top research enterprises in the field of metabolic disease research,” Dr. Wang added.

 

 

Dr. Michael Weaver appointed Chair of Neurosurgery at Temple

 

Michael W. Weaver, MDJune 28, 2013. Michael W. Weaver, MD, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM), has been appointed Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at TUSM. He has served as Interim Chair of the Department since August 2012 and was selected after a national search.

 

Board-certified in neurological surgery, Dr. Weaver completed his undergraduate education at Franklin and Marshall College, and earned his MD degree from Temple University School of Medicine. He remained at Temple after graduation to complete a general surgery internship and a neurosurgery residency. Dr. Weaver also completed a six-month pediatric neurosurgery residency at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago, and a six-month Neurosurgical Fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital before returning to Temple.

 

In addition to his other roles, Dr. Weaver also currently serves as Medical Director of Temple’s Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit. His clinical interests include neuro-oncology, intracranial procedures involving skull-based surgery, and cerebrovascular surgery. Dr. Weaver is also a dedicated researcher with past and current work in the areas of neuro-oncology and cerebrovascular research. He and his colleagues are also actively involved in developing brain tumor protocols.

 

Dr. Weaver has been named a “Rising Star” in Philadelphia magazine’s “Top Doctors” list. He is an inductee of Temple University School of Medicine’s Epsilon Chapter of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, and is the recipient of the Medical School’s Augustine R. Peale Award and Mary Wiederman Award in Physiology. Dr. Weaver is a member of a number of professional organizations and specialty societies, including the American Medical Association, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the American College of Surgeons, and the Pennsylvania Medical Society. He has also made numerous original contributions to the medical literature, and been asked to make nearly two dozen lectures and presentations at international and national meetings.

 

 

Temple medical resident earns Humaneness in Medicine Award from Philadelphia County Medical Society

 

Jocelyn Edathil, MD, PhDJune 10, 2013. Jocelyn Edathil, MD, PhD, a third-year internal medicine resident at Temple University Hospital, has earned the Vanitha Appadorai Vaidya, MD Award for Humaneness in Medicine from the Philadelphia County Medical Society. The award is presented to a resident or fellow in recognition of their skills in working with people, patients and their families, and understanding human as well as clinical needs.

 

Dr. Edathil has a special interest in HIV research and translational medicine. She earned her PhD in organic chemistry focusing on antiviral drug design. At the completion of her residency, Dr. Edathil plans to become a missionary and focus on global health in HIV.

 

She received the award during a June 8 ceremony at the Rittenhouse Hotel in Philadelphia.

 

 

Dr. Curtis Miyamoto, Chair of Radiation Oncology at Temple, elected President of Philadelphia County Medical Society

 

Curtis Miyamoto, MDJune 10, 2013. Curtis Miyamoto, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Temple University School of Medicine, has been installed as the 152nd President of the Philadelphia County Medical Society (PCMS). He was elected by his peers and will serve as president of PCMS for one year.

 

Dr. Miyamoto has been a member of PCMS and the Pennsylvania Medical Society (PAMED) since 2002. He has served on the PCMS Board of Directors as past Treasurer, past Delegate-at-Large and President-Elect. Dr. Miyamoto has also served as mentor for the PCMS Medical Student Section and is currently a Delegate to the PAMED House of Delegates.

 

“I am extremely honored to be the 152nd President of the Philadelphia County Medical Society,” said Dr. Miyamoto. “I look forward to leading the organization and bringing talented people together to create solutions to problems that are challenging the healthcare community at large.”

 

Dr. Miyamoto’s clinical and research interests include general external beam radiation; 3-D conformal radiotherapy; stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy; intensity modulated radiation therapy; image-guided radiation therapy; Gamma Knife® treatments; translational research; brain tumors and disorders; and prostate, lung, breast and gastrointestinal cancers. He earned his MD from the Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona, Spain, and went on to complete a radiation oncology residency and a radiation oncology and nuclear medicine research fellowship at Hahnemann University Hospital. Dr. Miyamoto also completed a fellowship with the American Cancer Society.

 

Dr. Miyamoto was installed as president of PCMS during a June 8 ceremony at the Rittenhouse Hotel in Philadelphia.

 

 

Two Temple University School of Medicine faculty  members selected for prestigious NIH posts

 

May 20, 2013. Joseph Cheung, MD, PhD, Senior Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, and Xiao-Feng Yang, MD, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology, Professor at the Cardiovascular Research Center and Professor at the Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center at Temple University School of Medicine, have been selected for prestigious posts as members of National Institutes of Health (NIH) study sections.

 

Members of NIH study sections are seasoned experts in their scientific disciplines, and selected on the basis of their research accomplishments, publication records and scientific honors. Study section members review grant applications submitted to the NIH from investigators all over the country, make recommendations on the applications to national advisory councils and survey the status of research in their fields.

 

Dr. Cheung has been selected for the NIH Electrophysiology, Signal Transduction and Arrhythmias Study Section. Dr. Yang has been selected for the Atherosclerosis and Inflammation of the Cardiovascular Systems Study Section. Their selections are effective July 1, 2013, and carry terms of five to six years.

 

“Membership on a study section represents a unique opportunity to contribute to the national biomedical research effort,” said Richard Nakamura, PhD, Director of the NIH Center for Scientific Review. “The functions are of great value to medical and allied research in this country.”

 

 

Darilyn V. Moyer, MD, FACP to become Chair-elect of the Board of Governors of National Doctors' Group

 

Darilyn V. Moyer, MD, FACPApril 8, 2013. Darilyn V. Moyer, MD, FACP, has been named Chair-elect of the Board of Governors of the American College of Physicians (ACP), the nation’s largest medical specialty organization. Dr. Moyer’s term will begin at the conclusion of Internal Medicine 2013, ACP’s annual scientific meeting in San Francisco, CA., April 11-13.

 

Dr. Moyer is currently serving as Governor of ACP’s Pennsylvania Southeastern Chapter. Governors are elected by local ACP members and serve four-year terms. Working with a local council, they supervise ACP chapter activities, appoint members to local committees, and preside at regional meetings. They also represent members by serving on the ACP Board of Governors. She has been a Fellow of the ACP (FACP) since 1995. FACP is an honorary designation that recognizes ongoing individual service and contributions to the practice of medicine.

 

Dr. Moyer is the Vice Chair and Internal Medicine Program Director, Department of Medicine, and Assistant Dean for Graduate Medical Education, Temple University School of Medicine and Temple University Hospital. She is a Professor of Medicine and Assistant Dean for Graduate Medical Education at Temple University School of Medicine. She is board certified in Internal Medicine and has completed Maintenance of Certification in Infectious Disease.

 

She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in the Biological Basis of Behavior, Biology and Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and attended medical school at Temple University School of Medicine. She completed her Internal Medicine Residency at Temple University Hospital and served as a Chief Resident/Clinical Instructor of Medicine. She went on to complete an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA.

 

Dr. Moyer is on the faculty in the Department of Medicine at Temple University School of and is an active practitioner in primary care, HIV and Infectious Diseases. She received the Temple University School of Medicine Women in Medicine Mentoring Award in 2012.

 

Her research and scholarly activity interests and presentations include those in the medical education, high value care, patient safety, professionalism and digital media and HIV/Infectious Diseases realm. She is the Co-Faculty Advisor for the Temple University School of Medicine Internal Medicine Interest Group and for the Temple University School of Medicine Student Educating About Healthcare Policy group.

 

The American College of Physicians (www.acponline.org) is the largest medical specialty organization and the second-largest physician group in the United States. ACP members include 133,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students. Internal medicine physicians are specialists who apply scientific knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness. Follow ACP on Twitter (www.twitter.com/acpinternists) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/acpinternists).