Japanese writing

 

TOKYO, JAPAN

SEMESTER/YEAR study abroad PROGRAM

 

Course Offerings

The following list includes courses that are popular among study abroad students and represents 20 of the disciplines offered at TUJ. Many additional courses are available and can be viewed on TUJ's course schedule. Here, courses are categorized into five broad areas of study: art; Asian studies; international business studies and economics; communications; and Japanese language. Many of the Asian studies courses offered are of an interdisciplinary nature and are cross-listed with other areas including American studies, anthropology, art history, history, Japanese, political science, sociology and psychology.


Course offerings vary from year to year. The final course schedule is determined the semester before enrollment and is made available to participating students following program acceptance.

You may also view course schedules for current and past semesters on the Temple University, Japan Campus, web site.

   

 

ART

 

Non-Temple students wishing to enroll in art courses requiring prerequisites are asked to submit a portfolio at the time of application. Specific prerequisites are included with each course description. See the Application Procedures section for more details regarding the required portfolio.

Art History 2008/Am St 3011 | History of Photography (3 credits)
Students in this course examine and analyze the history of the photographic process and its product from its inception to contemporary innovations. Critical approaches to the evaluation and interpretation of photography are also explored.

Art History 2097 | Japanese Art and Visual Culture: 1945 to the Present (3 credits)
A selected topic from a specific period in the history of art will be examined.

NOTE: This is a Writing Intensive Course. Field trips are mandatory for this class.

 

Art History 2610 | Topics in Modern and Contemporary Art: Art and the Everyday (4 credits)
A selected topic in Modern and Contemporary Art will be examined. Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.

Art History 2644 | Modern Art: 1945 to the Present (3 credits)

This course examines the major artists and movements in art from 1945 to the present, placing them within a larger social and political context. Developments to be considered include: Abstract Expressionism; Neo-Dada; Nouveaux Realism; Assemblage; Environments; Happenings; Pop; Op; Minimal; Post-Minimal; Performance; Earthworks; Conceptual; Installation; New Image; Neo-Expressionism; Post/Neo-Conceptual; and others. Issues of feminism, multiculturalism, and critical theory are also considered. Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.


 

Art 1101 | Introduction to Visual Language: Painting (3 credits)

A foundation course in painting focusing on painting techniques, conceptual development, and the use of elements of design for creative expression. Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

 

Art 1201 | Introduction to Visual Language: 3-D Design (3 credits)

A foundation course in 3-D design focusing on the principles, elements, and technical processes for visual understanding and creative expression. Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

 

Art 1401 | Introduction to Visual Language: Drawing (3 credits)

A foundation course in drawing focusing on drawing techniques, conceptual development, and the use of elements of design for creative expression. Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

 

Art 1501 | Introduction to Visual Language: Design (3 credits)

A foundation course in design focusing on the principles, elements, and technical processes for visual understanding and creative expression. Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Art 2102 | Intermediate Painting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 1101. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
A course in oil painting that builds on the ideas introduced in Art 1101: Introduction to Visual Language, Painting. Emphasis is on conceptual and technical growth.

 

Art 2202 | Intermediate 3-D (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 1201. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
Three-dimensional design theory and practice through construction techniques in wood and other materials. Emphasis is on conceptual growth.

Art 2301 | Relief Printmaking (3 credits)
An introduction to basic relief printmaking, black/white and color, in wood, linoleum, metal and various other materials.


Art 2302 | Intermediate Printmaking, Relief (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2301. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
Continued studies in relief processes including photographic and digital printmaking, with emphasis on conceptual growth and individual instruction.


Art 2402 | Intermediate Drawing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2601. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
This course serves to deepen students' engagement with the computer as a tool for fine arts. Students explore image making in relation to contemporary practices and work with alternative methods of using the computer as a medium.

Art 2601 | Computer Imaging (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the computer as an artist's tool. Emphasis is on developing personal imagery and exploring the ways that the computer can serve as a vehicle for artistic expression. Students should have some previous studio art experience before taking this class.


Art 2602 | Intermediate Computer Imaging (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2601. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
This course serves to deepen students' engagement with the computer as a tool for fine arts. Students explore image making in relation to contemporary practices and work with alternative methods of using the computer as a medium.

Art 2605 I Internet Imaging (3 credits) Spring only
Prerequisite: Art 2601 or 2811. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
An introductory course that explores the medium of digital imaging as presented on the internet. Applications such as Photoshop, Fireworks and Flash are employed to create images, and Dreamweaver is used to put them all together as web sites. The use of color tools, such as digital cameras and scanners, is also taught.

Art 2811 | Art Photography, Digital (3 credits)
An exploration of the basic principles of digital art photography, including shooting with a digital camera, manipulating images on the computer, and printing to inkjet printers, with focus on black and white photography, including duotones. 

Art 2812 | Intermediate Art Photography, Digital (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Art 2811. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
Continued studies in digital photography including the introduction of color photography and its relevant aesthetics, and the use of the web as a presentation medium. Emphasis is on conceptual growth through personal vision.


Art 2835 | Art Photo/Moving Image (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2601 or Art 2811. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
This course allows artists to use the medium of video to investigate their world. The technical end involves shooting digital video, transferring to computer, computer editing, post processing, sound editing and processing, and burning finished pieces to DVD. Students are also introduced to alternative ways of creating moving images using digital based animation software to investigate art of motion graphics. The aesthetics are from the art world rather than the commercial, documentary, or Hollywood styles. Knowledge of computers for visual application is expected.

Art 3103 | Advanced Painting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2102. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.

This course builds on the ideas covered in Art 2102 with emphasis on strategies for helping the student find his/her own voice at the same time as developing-technical skills and knowledge of contemporary artists. Emphasis is also placed on disciplined draftsmanship and imaginative composition.

Art 3203 | Advanced 3-D (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2202. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
Workshop course for students wishing to focus on advanced 3-D with emphasis on individual instruction.

Art 3303 | Advanced Printmaking (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2302, Art 2312, or Art 3321. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
Exploration of advanced printmaking problems.

Art 3321 | Intermediate Printmaking, Digital (3 credits) Fall only
Prerequisite: Art 2301 or 2311 and Art 2601. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
This course integrates a variety of digital applications and the traditional printmaking processes of relief, intaglio and lithography. Emphasis is on creative growth and individual instruction. Printmaking experience is required, and computer imaging experience is recommended.

Art 3403 | Advanced Drawing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2402. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
Drawing as an art form with emphasis upon disciplined draftsmanship and imaginative composition.

Art 3603 | Advanced Computer Imaging (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Art 2602. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
An advanced course in which students explore the computer as a tool for artists. Students will be expected to explore their personal imagery and artistic goals through using the computer to make several long-term ambitious projects.

Art 3813 | Advanced Art Photography, Digital (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Art 2812. For non-Temple student, portfolio approval.
Continued studies in digital photography. Emphasis is on conceptual growth through individual instruction. Advanced forms of presentation include multiple prints, interactive images and dynamic photographs.

Art 3825 | Intermediate Art Photography: Hybrid (3 credits) Spring and Summer only
Prerequisite: Art 2801 and Art 2812. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
This upper-level course introduces a wide range of processes that integrate digital and darkroom techniques and aesthetics to produce work in this new genre of photography. Aesthetic problems are posed that use the formal characteristics of these special media to support image content to best advantage. Students must have experience with both darkroom and digital photography.


Art 3826 | Advanced Art Photography: Hybrid (3 credits) Spring and Summer only
Prerequisite: Art 2812 and Art 3825. For non-Temple students, portfolio approval.
This advanced level class offers an opportunity to study and develop the use of photographic media that integrate digital and darkroom processes and aesthetics to produce a meaningful body of work in this new genre of photography. Students must have experience with both darkroom and digital photography.

Art 4148 | Painting Workshop (3 credits)
An advanced level painting course focusing on the refinement of skills and personal expression. Individual instruction and self motivation are emphasized.

 

Art 4448 | Drawing Workshop (3 credits)

An advanced level drawing course focusing on the refinement of skills and personal expression. Individual instruction and motivation are emphasized.

 

Art 4648 | Computer Imaging Workshop (3 credits)

Advanced study of aesthetics and techniques of computer imaging with emphasis on individual instruction.

 

Art 4848 | Art Photography Workshop (3 credits)

A top-level course for the study of advanced photographic techniques and aesthetics. The student is expected to design a course of study (proposal required) that is particular to his or her own interests and that involves aspects of photography not available in the other course offerings. Work can be realized in either the darkroom or digital studio and must include unique techniques, aesthetics, and presentation.

 

Portfolio Level Courses are also available.


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ASIAN STUDIES

 

Many courses that follow are cross-listed with other areas including:

 

  American Studies
Japanese
  Anthropology
Political Science
  Art History
Sociology
  History
Psychology

 

Asian Studies 2000/3000 | Special Topics in Asian Studies I/II (3 credits)
Special topics courses with substantial Asian studies content.  Past topics include Japanese Politics Today, Modern and Contemporary Japanese Art, Prejudice and Discrimination in Japan, Manga in Japanese Popular Culture, Japanese Music, Nationalism in Japan: Past and Present, and Intercultural Marriage. Cross-listed with Japanese 2011.

Asian Studies 2011 | Survey of Japanese Literature before 1868 (3 credits)Novels, poetry, travel diaries, plays, and other genres from Japan's Heian through Edo periods. Note: No knowledge of Japanese language expected.

Asian Studies 2012 | Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation (3 credits)
A survey of modern Japanese literature focusing on novels and short stories. Authors include Tanizaki, Kawabata and Mishima. Cross-listed with Japanese 2012. Note: Knowledge of Japanese language is not required.

 

Asian Studies 2015 | Tokyo in Lterature and Film (3 credits)

Like all great cities, Tokyo simultaneously fascinates and frightens us. The course explores this fascination and fear through the work of leading writers and directors who have responded to and shaped the city in their work. Readings will include essays, short stories, and novels by authors such as Yasunari Kawabata, Fumiko Hayashi, Banana Yoshimoto, and Haruki Murakami. Films by directors such as Yasujiro Ozu, Satoshi Kon, and Shosuke Murakami will be reviewed and discussed. Cross-listed with Japanese 2015.

 

Asian Studies 2096 | Writing Seminar (4 credits)

A writing-intensive course with substantial Asian Studies content. Topics vary each semester.

Asian Studies 2098 | Japanese Popular Culture and Its Literature (3 credits)

Contemporary culture and literature of Japan. Cross-listed with American Studies 2107 and History 2107. Note: No knowledge of Japanese language expected.

 

Asian Studies 2107 | Asian American Experiences (3 credits)
This introductory survey analyzes commonalities and differences in the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian American ethnic groups, Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans, and South and Southeast Asians. It explores important ideas about the position of Asians in U.S. society, including racialization, assimilation, cultural pluralism, model minority thesis, split labor market, and internal colonialism. It begins with the arrival of the Chinese in the 1830s and ends with contemporary issues. Cross-listed with American Studies 2107 and History 2107.

 

Asian Studies 2238 | The Visual Anthropology of Modern Japan (3 credits)

This course offers an anthropological approach to systems of visual communication that are central to understanding Japanese society and culture. Themes and perspectives from visual anthropology will be applied to visual sign systems of everyday life (writing, clothes, food, etc.), to the prevalence and influences of popular culture emphasizing mass mediated forms of manga (comic books), advertisements, etc. The course will also include ethnographic films about Japanese culture as well as a review of how Japanese culture is communicated to mass audiences through classic and contemporary feature films as well as network television. We will try to unpack some of the stereotypic reductions common to superficial knowledge of Japan and Japanese culture. Cross-listed with Anthropology 2238.


Asian Studies 2351 | Japan in a Changing World Order (3 credits)

An examination and analysis of the key elements that contribute to Japan's behavior in the global arena. The development of Japan's interaction with foreign powers, the psychological underpinnings of its diplomacy, and the creation of Tokyo's world view will be discussed. Cross-listed with Political Science 2351.

 

Asian Studies 2373: Japanese Culture (3 credits)
An introduction to traditional and contemporary Japanese culture. Topics include early literature, aesthetic principles, religion, gender roles, Japan’s shifting relationships with the world, communities in the 20th century and the construction of the self in modern Japan. Cross-listed with Anthropology 2373.


Asian Studies 2501 | Introduction to East Asia: China (3 credits)

Within the context of larger processes of socioeconomic and cultural change, this course examines the development of characteristic institutions and thought in traditional China and revolutionary transformation in the modern era. This approach is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of state, society, and culture in China, the major themes of Chinese history, and more generally, broad processes of social change. Cross-listed with History 2501.


Asian Studies 2502 | Introduction to East Asia: Japan (3 credits)

A survey of Japan’s evolution from an isolated island kingdom in ancient times to a world power in the 20th century, with a focus on continuity and change in religion, government and family life. Cross-listed with History 2502.

Asian Studies 2511 | Introduction to Asian Business (3 credits)

An overview of Asian business practices and their economic, political, and social contexts, with emphasis on Japan, China, Korea, and India.


Asian Studies 2815 | Japanese Art (4 credits)
A look at Japanese history through art, with the primary focus on design and pattern. Examines all the major art forms from the earliest times to the present. Cross-listed with Art History 2815.

Asian Studies 3247 | Ideology and Social Change in Japan (3 credits)
A sociological look at the conditions that have contributed to Japan's emergence as a world-class economic force. How did culture, social organization, lifestyle, ideology and global political change fit together and react to affect Japan's rapid rise to power? Is Japan a closed society? What significance do factors such as racism, religion, education, family, the military, class and population changes hold for understanding what happened in Japan and in Japan's relations with outsiders, particularly the United States? How does this analysis affect the future of American sociology? Cross-listed with Sociology 3247.

Asian Studies 3252 | East Asia and the United States (3 credits)
This course looks at the development of the Pacific Rim strategy in Japan over the past century and its spread into other regions of Asia, including South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and even mainland China. The strengths, problems, and implications for the United States of this pattern of development are examined. Cross-listed with Political Science 3252.

Asian Studies 3541 | Japan Today (3 credits)
An examination of the significant social, economic and cultural trends in Japan from 1945 to the 1990s. Includes a look at the Occupation; the economic miracle; state and society; the world of work; family, women and gender; international relations; the impact of affluence; post-bubble Japan; and varying approaches to the study of postwar Japanese history and society. Cross-listed with History 3541.

Asian Studies 4096 | Writing Seminar in Asian Studies (3 credits)

Prerequisite: written permission of the instructor.

A course in which topics are to be decided between the student and the faculty member.  Note: This is a capstone W course.

Asian Studies 4696 | Modern Japan: Empire, War, Society (3 credits)
A survey of Japanese people, culture, events and trends designed to answer various questions about Japan. Was early modern Japan static and unchanging? Do the roots of Japan’s modern achievements lie in early modern culture? What happened to Japan after the 1868 Meiji Restoration, and why? Was modernity a blessing or a curse? Cross-listed with History 4697.

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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STUDIES and Economics

 

Most international business studies and economics courses assume students have at minimum an introductory-level background in the area of study. Some courses are recommended for certain majors. Specific prerequisites are included with each course description.

Accounting 2101 | Financial Accounting (3 credits)

A look at the basic concepts and principles underlying the preparation and use of financial statements. Among the topics will be basic accounting theory, transactional analysis, income determination, asset and liability valuation, and the preparation of financial statements.


Accounting 2102 | Managerial Accounting (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Accounting 2101, or equivalent.

An examination of basic concepts relating to the manager's role in making business decisions using accounting data. Topics include organization for control, determining cost behavior, responsibility accounting, capital budgeting, and profit planning.


Economics 3501 | Intermediate Microeconomics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Introductory Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, or permission of instructor.
An intermediate treatment of microeconomic theory and applications. Topics include consumer behavior, production, costs, perfect competition, imperfect competition, factor markets, public goods and market failure. Note: Designed for economics, finance and actuarial science majors.

Economics 3502 | Intermediate Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Introductory Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, or permission of instructor.
An intermediate treatment of macroeconomic theory and policy. Following a discussion of the important macroeconomic sectors, static and dynamic macroeconomic models are developed. Unemployment, inflation, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth and the balance of payments are then analyzed using these models. Note: Designed for economics, finance and actuarial science majors.

Economics 3538 | Mangerial Economics (3 credits)
The application of microeconomic principles to business planning and decision-making. Topics include demand estimation, cost analysis, and production planning.

 

Economics 3547 | Economics of Development and Growth (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Introductory Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, or permission of instructor.

A study of the factors determining economic development and growth, of alternative theories of development and empirical studies, and of the role of noneconomic factors.

Economics 3563 | International Trade (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Introductory Macroeconomics and Microeconomics.
An examination of the basic theories of international trade, commercial policy and factor movements. Topics may include the relation between trade and economic growth, global aspects of U.S. trade policy, international trade agreements and protectionism.

Economics 3564 | International Monetary Economics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Introductory Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of the balance of payments and foreign currency markets. Topics include the international payments system, foreign investment and debt, and exchange rate regimes.

Human Resource Management 1101 | Leadership and Organizational Management (3 credits)

This course prepares students to address the challenges of leading high performing organizations. Students will examine the enablers of principled organizational leadership and performance. Course topics include leadership, change management, decision-making, culture, team building, organizational structure and control, communication, social responsibility and sustainability, motivation, human resource management, and globalization.


International Business Studies 3101 | Introduction to Global
Finance (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Introductory Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, and college algebra. It is recommended that students have also completed a course in

International Monetary Economics.

This course addresses corporate financing issues in the global financial environment relevant for international corporations or MNCs/MNEs. Topics to be discussed in the course will include: BOP accounts; foreign exchange-rate determination and markets; foreign exchange risk management; corporate strategy for foreign direct investment; valuation of foreign investments; global debt and equity financing, and project finance; international capital budgeting decision process associated with political, sovereign (country) and inflation risks. The perspective of cash versus equity purchases; mergers and acquisitions; comparisons of corporate governance practices around the world; and international taxation will also be touched upon and explored.


International Business Studies 3102 | Global Operations and
Supply Chain Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: a course in Business Statistics or Statistics and Probability. At Temple, Statistics 2103 or Mathematics 2031.

This course is designed to present and discuss concepts, issues and problems critical to global operations, with some emphasis on global supply chains. The course seeks to provide an understanding of the importance of individual components (suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers) in the operation of the supply chain. Coverage will include successful approaches in the areas of product and service design, global sourcing and logistics management, sales and operations planning, scheduling, resources planning, inventory management, and project management, among others, which have led to dramatic improvements in global business performance. Important recent developments and approaches for the effective and efficient operation of global supply chains will be identified and discussed. Also, in this course, a software package used for project management, such as MS Project, will be introduced.


International Business Studies 3501 | Marketing in a Global
Environment (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Introductory Marketing.
This course takes a culturally driven approach to international marketing. It will examine how multinational companies adapt to international opportunity and constraints. Marketing topics covered include global marketing; government regulations; organizational structure; product, price, promotion, and credit policies and methods. The course will combine cases, discussions, and readings to provide a mix of integrating concepts and hands-on problem solving.


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Communications

 

Many communications courses assume students have at minimum an introductory-level background in the area of study. Specific prerequisites are included with each course description.

 

Film and Media Arts 1141 | Media Arts I (4 credits)

An introductory course in media arts and theory that examines the history and practice of image-making, sound production and new technologies. Students explore hands-on production processes and the theoretical foundations of film, video and audio in a range of technologies including low-tech, professional studio and computerized digital formats. Coursework emphasizes individual students’ rigorous exploration of creative, personal visions, along with commercial applications.


Film and Media Arts 1142 | Media Arts II (4 credits)
Prerequisite: Film and Media Arts 1141.
A continuation of media arts and theory with an increased emphasis on aesthetics, genres, writing and project design. Assigned production projects and readings include documentary, fictional and experimental formats.

Film and Media Arts 2242 | Videography (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of film and media arts foundational courses, or permission of instructor.
Intensive instruction and practice with the tools of recording and structuring video. Coursework consists of individual and group exercises and projects conducted in the studio and in the field.


Film and Media Arts 2670 | Topics in Film Study (3 credits)

Prerequisite: completion of a prior media studies course.
An intermediate exploratory seminar in film study. Past topics include Films of Yasujiro Ozu, Period Films of Akira Kurosawa, Learning through Mistakes – The Incredible Horrors of Filmmaking, and Breaking Stereotypes: Gender Benders in Film.

Film and Media Arts 3696 | Writing Intensive in Film (3 credits)

Prerequisite: introductory film studies.  At Temple, Film and Media Arts 1172 or English 2711.
An exploratory writing-intensive seminar with varying special topics. Past topics include Women in the Films of Mizoguchi, Ozu and Naruse; Contemporary South Korean Cinema; and Japanese Pop Culture Film.The course includes lectures, screenings, discussions and written assignments.

Film and Media Arts 4673 | International Cinema (4 credits)
Prerequisite: Introductory film studies. At Temple, Film and Media Arts 1172, English 2711, or Communications Studies 2111.
The course will survey and exami.ne the various cultural determinants of international film forms through screenings, lectures, and readings. It will attempt to define the differences and similarities between mainstream Hollywood cinema and the range of international film forms from Africa, Latin America, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

Journalism 2101 | Journalism Research (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Introduction to journalism and writing for journalism. At Temple, Journalism 1111 and Journalism 1196.
Introduction to research used in journalism, including library materials, the World Wide Web, and electronic databases. Course includes retrieval, analysis, and presentation of data with final projects.

Journalism 3708 | Newsroom Management (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Introduction to journalism course. At Temple, Journalism 1111 or Communications Studies 2111.
This course enables students to develop their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills by working through key supervision and leadership issues facing managers in a typical newsroom setting. Students are provided with case studies, techniques and strategies for addressing team-building issues and the ethical and other concerns surrounding newsroom leadership, whatever the newsroom platform, print, broadcast, or online.

Media Studies and Production* 2701 | Introduction to Media Production (4 credits)
Prerequisite: Introduction to digital media studies technology. At Temple, Media Studies and Production (or BTMM) 1701.
This is an introductory level production course in which students study the various techniques and practices involved with creating and understanding media production. Students become familiar with all of the basic aspects of television production in its three stages: pre-production, production and post-production. Student will be required to work both individually and in groups to complete various studio and field projects throughout the semester. Students will also gain an understanding of the ethical issues faced in creating such media.

Media Studies and Production* 3890 | Intermediate Topics in Media and Telecommunication Production (2-4 credits)

Prerequisite: Introduction to degital media studies technology.  At Temple, Media Studies and Production (or BTMM) 1701.
Specific topic varies each semester. Past topics have included Film Festival Management and Podcast.


*Formerly called Broadcasting, Telecommunications, and Mass Media (BTMM)



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JAPANESE Language

 

Japanese 1001 | Japanese Elements I (4 credits)
A beginning course in Japanese for students who have had little or no Japanese language study. This course introduces some basic but useful conversational expressions; the two sets of syllabic symbols and some 30 pictograph kanji; and the most fundamental grammatical rules: past and non-past, negation, questions
and requests.

Japanese 1002 | Japanese Elements II (4 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 1001, or equivalent.
Focus on learning new sentence structures and vocabulary. An additional 50 kanji (beyond Japanese 1001) and some basics for different levels of formality in conversation are introduced. Students are required to write short compositions and letters.

Japanese 1003 | Oral Intensive Japanese I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Japanese 1002, or equivalent.

A bridge between beginning and intermediate Japanese levels, this course emphasizes vocabulary-building and the use of spoken Japanese through situational conversational practice.  Tests are in listening and reading comprehension and in structured interviews.  An ability to read and write hiragana and katakana is required, as is a mastery of most basic grammatical rules.

Japanese 1301 | Kanji I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Japanese 1001, or equivalent.

Kanji or Chinese characters are an integral part of the Japanese orthography system, which is considered as a key factor to learners’ reading comprehension and vocabulary building. However, Kanji is considered to be difficult and rather time-consuming to acquire, especially for learners from alphabetic orthography systems such as English speakers. This course is thus designed to promote students’ understanding and mastery of 300 basic Kanji and to help them establish a solid foundation to learn novel and complex Kanji in the course of their learning Japanese. By mastering 300 basic Kanji, students will acquire the Kanji proficiency equivalent to JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) N4, and also improve their reading and writing skills in addition to vocabulary building. More important, students will learn how to “learn” novel Kanji.

Japanese 2003 | Oral Intensive Japanese II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 2002 or 2702, or equivalent.
A bridge between intermediate and advanced Japanese levels, this course focuses on vocabulary acquisition in a variety of conversational situations. Throughout the semester, several vocabulary quizzes and structure tests are given, while the final exam is in the form of interviews. Students complete one project involving various communication activities outside the classroom.

Japanese 2301 | Kanji II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Japanese 1301, or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Kanji I and designed to promote students’ understanding and mastery of an additional 300 (or more) Kanji at the intermediate level. By mastering the additional 300 Kanji, students will acquire the Kanji proficiency equivalent to JLPT N3, and also improve their reading and writing skills in addition to vocabulary building.


Japanese 2522 | Basic Writing in Japanese (3 credits) Spring only

Prerequisite: Japanese 2001, or equivalent.

This course is designed to introduce students whose native language is not Japanese to basic-level writing skills that go beyond mere sentence manipulation drills. With a focus on paragraph development, students will learn, step by step, the organizational principles that will help them express themselves effectively in Japanese on familiar topics, such as family, daily activities, personal possessions and experiences. Students will also learn to incorporate newly learned vocabulary and structures effectively into their writing to further enhance their overall Japanese language skills.


Japanese 2631 | Structure of Japanese Language I (3 credits) Fall only

Prerequisite: Japanese 2002, or equivalent.

This course is designed to accomplish three major objectives to further develop students’ Japanese language proficiency. First, it will help students have a strong command of the basic and more complicated rules of Japanese grammar already introduced in Japanese 1001, 1002, 2001, & 2002. Second, it will also help students further improve their fluency in both comprehension and production. Lastly, it will also help students pass N4 of JLPT.

Japanese 2701 | Intermediate Japanese I - TUJ  (4 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 1002, or equivalent.

Japanese 2701 is the first of TUJ’s intermediate Japanese language courses. It adopts an integrated approach to develop students’ communicative competence for everyday communication. In addition to the course work and assignments, students are strongly recommended to spend at least one hour per week at the language lab.

Japanese 2702 | Intermediate Japanese II - TUJ (4 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 2001 or 2701, or equivalent.
Japanese 2702 is the second of TUJ’s intermediate Japanese language courses.
It adopts an integrated approach to develop students’ communicative competence for everyday communication. In addition to the course work and assignments, students are strongly recommended to spend at least one hour per week at the language lab.

Japanese 3000/3010: Special Topics in Japanese I/II (3 credits)
Topics focus on aspects of the language, literature or culture of Japan. In recent semesters, the topic has been Japanese Communication and Culture. Note: Knowledge of Japanese language is not required.

Japanese 3001: Advanced Japanese I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 2002 or 2702, or equivalent.

A focus on Japanese sociocultural studies, including the levels of formality in writing and conversation. There are approximately 300 kanji and 600 kanji idioms to review or to learn. Students are required to write a number of essays and make oral presentations.

Japanese 3002: Advanced Japanese II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 3001, or equivalent.
A course focusing on intercultural studies. Students review or learn some 300 kanji and 600 kanji idioms, conduct a descriptive survey of a cultural aspect, and report on the results.

Japanese 3631 | Structure of Japanese Language II (3 credits) Spring only

Prerequisite: Japanese 3002, or equivalent.

This course is designed to accomplish four major objectives. First, it will help students have a strong command of the advanced rules of Japanese grammar already learned in Japanese 3001 and 3002 to practice with complete control. Second, it will help students further improve their fluency both in comprehension and production in academic discourse. Third, it will also help students further develop their communicative competence, focusing on sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects of Japanese language. Students will learn how to appropriately deal with social dominance, the social distance, and a variety of situations in advanced discourse. Lastly, it will help students pass N3 of JPLT.


Japanese 4001 | Advanced Japanese III (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Japanese 3002, or equivalent.

This course has five major goals. First, it will help students develop a higher level of reading and writing skills, and familiarize with socio-cultural topics. Second, it will help students improve their levels of formality in speaking in different situations of their everyday conversation and academic discourse. Third, it will also help students develop critical thinking and manners for discussion in Japanese. Fourth, it will help students learn idiomatic expressions and more involved syntactical forms. Lastly, it will help students pass N2 of the JLPT.

Japanese 4002 | Advanced Japanese IV (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Japanese 4001, or equivalent.

This is the last one of four courses in a series of Advanced Japanese courses which focuses on the levels of formality or politeness in conversation as well as on fifteen socio-cultural topics in the Japanese speaking community. This course covers chapters 13, 14, and 15 of the textbook. The course is designed to accomplish four major objectives. First, it will help students develop a higher level of reading and writing skills, and familiarize with haiku as well as socio-cultural topics. Second, it will also help students develop critical thinking, interview and debate skills in Japanese. Third, it will help students learn more involved idiomatic expressions and syntactical forms. Lastly, it will help students pass N2 of Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT). To achieve these goals, this course will provide students with three reading topics: Japanese people and Nature, Politics in Japan, and the Future of World and Japan, in a variety of forms (i.e., reading and speaking based discussion). Each topic has its own focus in the speaking section such as interviewing, debating academic and social issues, and agreeing and disagreeing with others’ opinions, to appropriately deal with the issues of politeness. Students are expected to use integrated skills to deal with each task presented in each chapter and also to build up their vocabulary and learn Chinese characters (Kanji) while completing reading, speaking, and grammar tasks. Moreover, students are required to conduct interviews with three people about a socio-cultural issue selected and to make a report on the results in two forms: an oral report in class and a written short paper.

Japanese 4003 | Advanced Oral Japanese (3 credits) Spring only

Prerequisite: Japanese 3002 or permission of instructor , or equivalent.

This course provides both oral and aural practice in Japanese by introducing theoretical and practical aspects of oral/aural skills. It is designed and intended for students who have successfully completed three years of Japanese language learning (Japanese Advanced II), and requires students’ advanced reading/writing skills in order to prepare their speech scripts.


Japanese 4196/4296/4396 | Seminar in Japanese and Japan (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Japanese 4001.
Seminar in Japanese and Japan is a capstone course that builds on the solid foundation of advanced linguistics skills, socio-cultural knowledge, and critical thinking that students have acquired. It also marks their final stage of Japanese language learning. Three topics (Topic I: Socio-cultural, Topic II: Business, Topic III: Literature) are offered alternately and designed to allow students to select and pursue a topic of their interest. In the courses, students will learn to read critically and properly appreciate the original texts of a selected topic. While reading about socio-cultural aspects, topics/issues in business, or literature, students will further their understanding of Japanese language. This course focuses on reading on socio-cultural aspects of Japan by reading newspapers. Newspapers are one of the main sources of information to learn about the society's present status, social and political problems, and perspectives for future. In this course, students will learn the most up-to-date information of Japanese society and develop their reading skills and comprehension by reading newspapers. To achieve those goals, the course is divided into two parts. The first half of the course will be devoted to developing reading skills and building lexicon necessary to understand newspaper articles as well as the stylistics and format characteristic of newspapers (e.g., the use of abbreviations and technical terms in the headlines and leads). In order to increase readiness for reading newspapers, students will read 5-7 short passages a day (with a complete vocabulary list) on a variety of topics. Students' acquisition of new vocabulary and expressions will be tested on a daily basis. In the second half of the semester, students will read Japanese newspaper articles weekly. Each week, two articles will be chosen for a class reading followed by discussions. In addition, each student will choose an article for a weekly oral report. Through reading and class discussions, students are expected to gain in-depth understanding and analytical views of contemporary Japanese society and culture.

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