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Unbought and Unbossed

Unbought and Unbossed
Transgressive Black Women, Sexuality, and Representation

Trimiko Melancon

Gender and Society posted an online first review of Unbought and Unbossed by Trimiko Melancon. The review read, "In Unbought and Unbossed, Trimiko Melancon weaves an insightful, critical analysis of discourses and literary representations of black women in novels by Gayl Jones, Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, Ann Allen Shockley, and Alice Walker. Melancon's central argument is that through depictions of transgressive sexuality, the novels defy traditional race, gender, and sexual representations of black women present in American literature. She smartly interprets expressions of black women's agency and resistance to white mainstream and Black Nationalist expectations.... Unbought and Unbossed is an important text for people interested in race, gender, sexuality, and intersectionality. The book opens up new ways to consider the transgressive sexuality of black women within works of literature."

Consuming Work

Consuming Work
Youth Labor in America

Yasemin Besen-Cassino

Social Forces posted an online first review of Consuming Work by Yasemin Besen-Cassino. The review read, "Consuming Work is promising in its detailed examination of the intersection of work, consumption, and leisure for middle- and upper-class (mostly white) college students who work in 'cool' but low-wage retail jobs.... Besen-Cassino's focus...[on] the young workers themselves...is both interesting and valuable, as it gives voice to a group of workers from whom we do not usually hear in scholarly accounts of work... Besen-Cassino rightly argues [that] the youth labor market is a fascinating and important site to explore the reproduction of inequality and other key labor-market dynamics in the United States. In its detailed study of affluent youth labor, Consuming Work provides rich data, many answers, and even more provocative questions to explore."

Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood

Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood
Brooklyn's Sunset Park

Tarry Hum

Reviewed online first in the July 2015 issue of Urban Studies. The review read, "Years of research have poured into this rich book that presents a true neighbourhood case study with topics as diverse (yet related) as street vendors, ethnic banks, gentrification, migrant civil society and environmental injustice.... Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood is recommended reading for all those interested in the intersection of urban and ethnic/racial studies and in particular those interested in migrant civil society, ethnic banks and immigrant growth coalitions."

"I Hear America Singing"

"I Hear America Singing"
Folk Music and National Identity

Rachel Clare Donaldson

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "The best intellectual history to date on the subject, this book treats the part of the US folk music revival that aligned itself with progressive politics from the 1930s through the 1960s. Donaldson chronicles the folk revival's involvement with the Depression and New Deal, WW II and the Cold War, and the Civil Rights Movement.... [S]he provides an excellent discussion of the Pete Seeger side of the revival.... [T]hose interested in folk music per se and its intersection with progressive politics during these critical decades will find this book valuable. Summing Up: Recommended."

Red War on the Family

Red War on the Family
Sex, Gender, and Americanism in the First Red Scare

Erica J. Ryan

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "[A]rgues Ryan, the Red Scare provided a means of countering the rapid social changes taking place in the late 1910s and 1920s, which included feminism, changing sexual morals, and the rise of companionate marriage. The author has an accessible writing style and convincingly argues her point. The book's nuanced subject matter will enrich research collections and prove most useful to readers at the graduate or faculty level. Summing Up: Recommended."

Senior Power or Senior Peril

Senior Power or Senior Peril
Aged Communities and American Society in the Twenty-First Century

Brittany H. Bramlett

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "Bramlett employs social science techniques to explore the empirical prevalence of two phenomena that have become journalistic tropes: 'senior power' and 'senior peril.'... The book contributes some modest additional findings to a topic sure to be of increasing importance in American politics in coming years. Summing Up: Highly Recommended."

America's First Adventure in China

America's First Adventure in China
Trade, Treaties, Opium, and Salvation

John R. Haddad

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Diplomatic History. The review read, "America's First Adventure in China is an impressive accomplishment. Haddad has crafted an engaging, historically grounded narrative that skillfully bridges the neighboring domains of American cultural studies and U.S. diplomatic history... The chronological signposts in Haddad's story are familiar to many, but in his retelling, the familiar becomes intriguing.... Haddad is a skillful narrator.... [His] coverage is brisk, clear and engaging. America's First Adventure in China is a valuable contribution to the literature on Sino-American relations, and a promising exemplar of postmodern narrative history."

Laotian Daughters

Laotian Daughters
Working toward Community, Belonging, and Environmental Justice

Bindi V. Shah

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Shah's book takes what seems to be a very narrow project and makes it a very important and broad one that has much utility for scholars working across many fields: sociology of immigration, intra and interethnic relations, youth and gender, refugee and American identity formation and critical citizenship studies, leadership development and environmental justice and urban activism. Her in-depth account of second-generation Laotian teenage girls in an environmental justice organization succeeds in articulating their struggle to challenge 'what it means to be American and are becoming American in the process.' Last, this book is well written and highly readable, and recommended for teaching in both undergraduate and graduate contexts in sociology."

How Racism Takes Place

How Racism Takes Place
George Lipsitz

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Lipsitz reminds scholars how fundamental white privilege to our society and how white privilege works.... Lipsitz superbly weaves connections from the past into contemporary issues.... The book offers its readers an astonishing look at unknown events that occurred during the era of Jim Crow, and Lipsitz provides evidence on how it applies to the contemporary issues that we still grapple with in this country: poverty, discrimination, white privilege, racism and violence."

Troubling Gender

Troubling Gender
Youth and Cumbia in Argentina's Music Scene

Pablo Vila and Pablo Semán

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Troubling Gender, a monograph focusing on the intersections of sex and cumbia music in contemporary Argentina, straddles quite impressively the difficulty of exploring how those who listen and dance to it negotiate and consume the encoded meanings in this popular music genre.... The book's writing style hits a successful balance between clarity and density, maintaining scholarly sophistication without sacrificing coherence or lucidity. But the most refreshing element of the book is how Troubling Gender is, actually, a textual collaboration.... Vila and Semán's findings stand by themselves solidly, and the historical chapter and postscript excellently complement the authors' arguments."

Sustainable Failures

Sustainable Failures
Environmental Policy and Democracy in a Petro-dependent World

Sherry Cable

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "In this well-researched and accessible volume on our environmental predicament, Sherry Cable asks: To what extent do environmental policies acknowledge ecological principles and enact principles of fairness and justice?... The book is rich in empirical detail, with numerous illustrative case studies and comprehensive inventories of the U.S. environmental policy regime."

Asian American Women's Popular Literature

Asian American Women's Popular Literature
Feminizing Genres and Neoliberal Belonging

Pamela Thoma

Reviewed in the Summer 2015 issue of MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. The review read, "Asian American Women's Popular Literature is a pleasurable read and an important contribution to recent scholarship on Asian American popular culture. As the title suggests, the book uncovers the ways in which Asian American women writers of different genres of fiction directly address Asian American women's political subjectivity and problematize contemporary reformulations of US citizenship and belonging under neoliberalism. The novel, Thoma argues, continues to be central to the development of citizen-subjects even as it now integrates with other media within neoliberal consumer culture.... Asian American Women's Popular Literature offers readers an impressively coherent theory of Asian American women's lowbrow literary texts and the important cultural work they do as popular texts."

Conceiving Masculinity

Conceiving Masculinity
Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity

Liberty Walther Barnes

Reviewed in the May 2015 issue of the journal Social History of Medicine. The review read, "Barnes' succeeds in providing a vivid account of the so far under researched experiences of men in the infertility encounter as couples are confronted with choices (or lack thereof). Conceiving Masculinity is a very readable story, offering a growing scholarship on the history of infertility and current insights into a gendered order of medical encounters with the body and disease."

Transfeminist Perspectives in and beyond Transgender and Gender Studies

Transfeminist Perspectives in and beyond Transgender and Gender Studies
edited by Anne Enke

Reviewed in Teachers College Record on May 7, 2015. The review read, "Taken individually, each chapter is informative and some are also provocative. Taken as a whole, the volume represents a substantive contribution to the literature on trans theory and practice in higher education and social policy.... There are three primary strengths of this text: the thoughtful navigation of highly contested language, the range of topics covered, and the connections to allied social/academic movements. The nuanced navigation of language that Enke provides is thoughtful and necessarily cautious.... This book has a wide range of audiences within and beyond transgender and gender studies classrooms.... The approachable, accessible writing style of the authors also makes this book useful to many outside of academia as well."

Pimping Fictions

Pimping Fictions
African American Crime Literature and the Untold Story of Black Pulp Publishing

Justin Gifford

Reviewed in the Volume 33, No. 1 of the journal, Clues: A Journal of Detection. The review read, "Justin Gifford's new monograph is impressive. He writes about a genre that historically has been both popular and met with strong critical condemnation. While acknowledging the reasoning for the latter, Gifford argues for understanding well why black crime (i.e., pulp) fiction has had and maintains a robust mass readership.... That dialogue is important for recognizing frankly the complicated legacies of our national past and present. For all the ways that forging a coherent cultural community over time has worked to give succor and strength to blacks in America... Gifford argues compellingly for giving critical consideration to black pulp fiction as a complex literary resource for understanding the complexity of racism and its lingering influences in the United States."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music
Edward Berger

Reviewed in Volume 44, No. 1 of the ARSC Journal (Association for Recorded Sound Collections). The review read, "Softly, With Feeling is first and foremost a very well researched and clearly written biography of a jazz trumpet icon who also distinguished himself in the classical idiom. It is also a book about race in America in the 1930s and the decades that followed, and offers insight into the music business, especially pertaining to the role of African Americans.... Overall this is a fascinating book about a marvelous and remarkable musician who could play jazz, classical, Broadway show music and just about anything else as evidenced by his recordings of bugle calls and a very convincingly idiomatic solo on a recording of 'Hava Nagilah' by an Israeli folk group, the Four Ayalons. There are some wonderful photos in the book, many taken by the author, as well as by the subject (Wilder was an accomplished photographer), and a very useful discography/solography for anyone who would like to check out the music of Joe Wilder. Edward Berger can proudly add this well done work to his impressive body of scholarly monographs."

Blow Up the Humanities

Blow Up the Humanities
Toby Miller

The blog Public: A Journal of Imagining America reviewed Toby Miller's Blow Up the Humanities along with The Heart of the Matter, by Richard H. Brodhead and John W. Rowe. The review read, "I want to applaud Toby Miller's 2012 book, Blow Up the Humanities, and recommend it as a lively antidote to many of the written and visual platitudes recycled in The Heart of the Matter. Miller is not a kind writer, but he does have a way with words and a deep understanding of the history of debates concerning the value of the humanities and humanistic social sciences, both nationally and internationally."

Laotian Daughters

Laotian Daughters
Working toward Community, Belonging, and Environmental Justice
Bindi V. Shah

Reviewed in the May 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "The book guides readers through dense explorations on the intersection of race, identity, citizenship, and power—but it is the girls' stories that breathe life into the book.... On balance, Laotian Daughters makes a compelling case for the power of critical incorporation. The book offers an engaging account of how a group of disadvantaged girls draws on the resources provided by their social activism on the road to 'becoming American.' Shah provides a thickly described ethnography that shows how environmental activism interacts with a number of forces (family, school, friends, the media) to delineate national, gender, and racial and ethnic boundaries.... [S]cholars of immigration, citizenship, and identity will find much to appreciate in this work."

Citizenship and Governance in a Changing City

Citizenship and Governance in a Changing City
Somerville, MA

Susan A. Ostrander

Reviewed in the May 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "In its best moments, Citizenship and Governance in a Changing City details tensions between [diverse] groups in ways reminiscent of the obvious pleasure that authors of classic community studies took when delving into the complex social fabric of their communities.... [T]he book succeeds in raising important questions and generating critical reflection."

Serial Fu Manchu

Serial Fu Manchu
The Chinese Supervillain and the Spread of Yellow Peril Ideology

Ruth Mayer

Reviewed in the May 2015 issue of Pacific Historical Review. The review read, "Mayer explores the pervasiveness of the Fu Manchu figure in twentieth-century American popular culture.... Serial Fu Manchu points to the importance of serialization in American popular culture and the common practice of creating and repackaging characters such as Fu Manchu within it. This practice reinforced Asian and Asian American stereotypes and affirmed American imperialist and nativist attitudes and policies in the twentieth century."

The War on Slums in the Southwest

The War on Slums in the Southwest
Public Housing and Slum Clearance in Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico, 1935-1965

Robert B. Fairbanks

The Spring 2015 issue of Legacies: A History Journal for Dallas and North Central Texas, reviewed Robert Fairbanks' The War on Slums in the Southwest. The review read, "[The book] solidifies Fairbanks' reputation: no one knows more about the fraught connections between housing policy and urban development at the local state and federal levels....a brilliant book."

Disability and Passing

Disability and Passing
Blurring the Lines of Identity

edited by Jeffrey A. Brune and Daniel J. Wilson

Reviewed in the Spring 2015 issue of the Bulletin of the History of Medicine read, "Granted the careful and sustained engagement... [the essays] introduce eight distinct and richly historicized modes of disability passing.... Disability and Passing is an opportune contribution to disability studies, particularly as these essays approach the social, cultural, and methodological issues raised by disability passing from the full breadth of the field's interdisciplinary reach. One of the most striking features of Disability and Passing, in fact, is how well suited this topic is to the genre of the edited collection. Many of the book's most illuminating insights lie in the surprising affinities that flash up among its otherwise disparate chapters."

Also reviewed in Vol. 9, Issue 1, 2015 of the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies read, "[A] fascinating and eclectic collection of essays concerned with the social and cultural significance of passing within disability studies.... Spanning issues of race, gender, sexuality, and class, Brune and Wilson's collection demonstrates the pervasive nature of passing, as a concern that affects all areas of identity politics, and makes for engaging and provocative reading."

Just Queer Folks

Just Queer Folks
Gender and Sexuality in Rural America

Colin R. Johnson

Reviewed in the Spring 2015 issue of Agricultural History. The review read, "Johnson's book adds to the growing rural queer scholarship that challenges long held arguments that 'rural' represents a negative foil to American cities for gay men and women.... [H]e challenges our reliance on rural-urban and hetero-homosexual divides to reveal a more complex history of queer America.... Throughout this well-argued book, Johnson connects urban and rural sexuality, dispels long held arguments about sexual identity and behavior, and demonstrates that—contrary to popular and historiographical belief—rural queerness has always existed."

Bullying

Bullying
The Social Destruction of Self

Laura Martocci

Reviewed in the Spring 2015 issue of Foreword Reviews. The review read, "Martocci's book is both compassionate and impartial, balancing the emotion surrounding bulling with the integrity of her research.... Martocci uses her expertise in sociology to deconstruct the cultural, social, and historical factors that drive bullying—and give those who've been bullied a means to shun shame and reconstruct their identities. Bullying delves into the origins of bullying and identifies the path to healing. Martocci doesn't brush off the problem or resort to pep talks; she proves that the best solutions dig to the root of the problem. By offering deep study and research into the many facets of bullying, she provides hope, showing how narrative writing allows people who've been bullied to structure their experiences and define themselves. For those whose sense of identity has been forced on them by others and whose day-to-day lives are run by shame and avoidance, this approach is powerful and life-giving.... Her tone is compassionate yet impartial, balancing the emotion of the subject and the integrity of research. Her interviews with people who have been bullied are insightful and heart-wrenching."

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America
The Argentine Puzzle in Context

Claudia Kedar

Reviewed in the Spring 2015 issue of Latin American Politics and Society. The review read, "Kedar's book on the role of the IMF in Argentina is a truly welcome addition. It provides perhaps one of the most comprehensive accounts of the fund's historical interaction with the region since the establishment of the Bretton Woods institutions.... [T]he book is a well-written and thoroughly enjoyable piece of research. It adds an important revisionist perspective to IMF-Argentine relations and depicts a far more nuanced and mutually dependent relationship than is commonly portrayed, both in Latin America and elsewhere.... This is an excellent book, which anyone interested in IMF relations with Latin America, and even the fund more generally, should read."

Atlanta Unbound
Enabling Sprawl through Policy and Planning

Carlton Wade Basmajian

Featured in the online "Book Notes" section of the journal Environment and Urbanization, April 2015 edition. The review read, "Based on detailed analyses of the post-war development of planning processes and regional institutions, the author makes the provocative argument that the extensive decentralization of Atlanta was a process actively enabled and coordinated across political scales by public institutions engaged in regional planning.... The book is a valuable resource for people with a specific interest in American metropolitan regions and Atlanta. However, there is also an overall argument about recognizing the importance of regional planning agencies relevant to city sprawl as critical actors that bridge local and national level government."

The War on Slums in the Southwest

The War on Slums in the Southwest
Public Housing and Slum Clearance in Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico, 1935-1965

Robert B. Fairbanks

Reviewed in the April 2015 issue of Southwest Historical Quarterly. The review read, "[An] excellent study.... Fairbanks shines the brightest when he is discussing one of the three Texas cities. [He] has done his homework with this volume. His sources are extensive.... The War on Slums in the Southwest is a well-written book that should be a great addition to the literature on the public housing movement."

The Gender Knot

The Gender Knot
Unraveling Our Patriarchal Legacy
Third Edition

Allan G. Johnson

Reviewed in the April 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Johnson argues that patriarchy is responsible for the oppression of women and that its core quality—male-identified control—generates a dynamic that promotes competition, oppression, violence, and fear and is as harmful to men as to women.... Clearly written and thought provoking.... Summing Up: Highly Recommended."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music
Edward Berger

The Jazz Society of Pensacola featured a review of Softly, with Feeling by Edward Berger, on its website the week od April 9th. The review read, "Wilder met discrimination because of his race, of course, many times during his lifetime, but he held to his principles of ethical behavior never stooping to the level of some of his detractors. And, as Berger so well documents, Wilder's ground-breaking achievements led the way for many others."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the March/April 2015 issue of the Women's Review of Books. The review read, "The book fill[s] a critical gap in queer and labor history.... and tell[s] stories of extraordinary courage and perseverance.... Frank captures the driving courage of LGBT workers as they participate in the labor movement, come out, and help others to do so. She reveals the crucial role they played in organizing campaigns, especially of teachers and public service workers, and in independent, left-inspired initiatives, for example, for gender and racial equality."

The Risk Society Revisited

The Risk Society Revisited
Social Theory and Governance

Eugene A. Rosa, Ortwin Renn and Aaron M. McCright

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of the American Journal of Sociology. The review read, "In the introduction the authors acknowledge the long-term structural and cultural changes that pushed us into a risk society. They argue that since there will always be real risks there is a need for concrete strategies to improve human ability and capacity to manage risk.... The book is timely in providing theoretical support for many calls for more participative approaches in, for instance, risk communication and governance, regional planning, and public policy."

The Politics of State Feminism

The Politics of State Feminism
Innovation in Comparative Research

Dorothy E. McBride and Amy G. Mazur

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "The Politics of State Feminism is strongest as a synthesis and extension of the insights from the collective comparative efforts of the Research Network on Gender Politics and the State (RNGS).... In tackling big questions of variations in the relationships between women's movements and the state as mediated by women's agencies, McBride and Mazur...make several important contributions.... Among the many innovations that stand out, their lucid summaries of the results of ordinal regression, crisp-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis and case studies make the book both a trove of empirical results and mixed-methods approaches, and an important resource for research pedagogy and practice.... McBride, Mazur and the RNGS network contribute important innovations to comparative research."

Living in the Crossfire

Living in the Crossfire
Favela Residents, Drug Dealers, and Police Violence in Rio de Janeiro

Maria Helena Moreira Alves and Philip Evanson

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "The interviews conducted by the authors and their research team are what give this work strength, and the book shines as Alves and Evanson let the testimonies of their respondents stand on their own.... The stories, revelations, challenges, contradictions, anecdotes and so on these transcripts reveal are truly fascinating.... Alves and Evanson present a dynamic view of Brazil's most recognizable city and, ultimately, are successful in showing the complexities of living in a Rio favela."

Multicultural Girlhood

Multicultural Girlhood
Racism, Sexuality, and the Conflicted Spaces of American Education

Mary E. Thomas

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Thomas challenges the common belief that multicultural education—whether based on understanding others, getting along and accepting others or developing respect-centered individual and group ethnic identities—can remedy school segregation and conflict.... Multicultural Girlhood is most provocative [when] Thomas shows how the girls unwittingly invest in racial conflict and segregation and how with such investment comes both positive and negative consequences.... Thomas' work is an important read.... It will give scholars and practitioners in the field of education much to ponder."

Music and Social Change in South Africa

Music and Social Change in South Africa
Maskanda Past and Present
Kathryn Olsen

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, The review read, "Written in clear, simple language, Music and Social Change in South Africa is an informative book that will be useful to ethnomusicology students interested in social changes in Africa, in particular South Africa during and after apartheid. Summing Up: Recommended."

Just Who Loses?

Just Who Loses?
Discrimination in the United States, Volume 2

Samuel Roundfield Lucas

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "The core argument that discrimination is about the context of social life and damaged social relations is a powerful one. The methodological injunction to measure variation in discrimination, rather than simply observing gross or net inequality, is smart and to be applauded. The movement away from a focus on individuals or, worse yet, individual acts, and to theorize social relations as social context are welcome interventions into the stratification literature.... When it comes to discrimination, the empirical answer Lucas provides is that everyone loses. Discrimination damages social relations and leads to weaker social institutions and a habitual neglect of the humanity of all human beings. This is a profound reformulation of research questions about discrimination, one that is likely to be scientifically and politically fruitful."

Social Justice in Diverse Suburbs

Social Justice in Diverse Suburbs
History, Politics, and Prospects

edited by Christopher Niedt

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of the Journal of Planning Education and Research. The review read, "[T]his edited volume offer[s] both historians and planners new ways to think about suburbs. For planners, the book serves as an activist handbook, combining historical examples, contemporary data, and policy proposals into a concise and accessible volume. For historians, the book pushes the historiography beyond any monolithic view of suburbs, presenting the urban fringe in all its complexity.... Taken together, the book is an engaging collection of papers that complement one another, an impressive feat."

Sex and the Founding Fathers

Sex and the Founding Fathers
The American Quest for a Relatable Past

Thomas A. Foster

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of the Journal of American History. The review read, "Foster tells us that each new generation has inquired into the intimate lives of great men and found reflections of its own habits and desires and anxieties....Using the methods of intellectual and cultural history, Foster examines contemporary and scholarly interpretations of the sex lives of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and Gouvernor Morris. Foster holds that we read and write about our Founding Fathers' intimate habits because we want these icons of masculinity to be relatable. Foster is right; we do seek ourselves in our histories."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Jazzwise. The review read, "A major strand of this well-wrought biography is a lengthy examination of the mid-century employment possibilities for African-American musicians in commercial and symphonic music.... [I]f ever a book cried out for a bound-in CD...it is this one, for its text is suffused with praise for Wilder's trumpet tone, his lyrical grace and total assurance whatever the musical circumstances."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Labor Studies Journal. The review read, "Miriam Frank's Out in the Union pursues a much-needed and highly ambitious project: telling the story of queer organizing within the American labor movement. The sheer scope and level of detail in the book are outstanding. So too are the array of stories Frank has collected in the many years of research and activism that contributed to the book. Frank presents these stories in a style that is erudite, yet at the same time powerful and compelling.... Out in the Union offers an important historical narrative that is needed now more than ever. It's a story that will leave all unionists with a profound sense of pride and inspire hope for the future."


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