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Down and Out in Los Angeles and Berlin

Down and Out in Los Angeles and Berlin
The Sociospatial Exclusion of Homeless People

Jürgen von Mahs

Reviewed in the August 2014 issue of Urban Studies. The review read, "[A] thoughtful account of the impact of public policy on homeless people and their prospects of escaping homelessness.... Mahs has produced a well-researched book that offers a unique insight into homeless peoples' lives in Berlin in the 1990s and thus will surely contribute to a more balanced debate about the geographies of homelessness beyond US cities."

200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia

200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia
The Staff of Al Día

Reviewed in the July/August 2014 issue of Pennsylvania Magazine. The review read, "This large-format book is an account of Latinos in Philadelphia throughout the past 200 years. The staff of the local newspaper Al Día has selected several hundred photos with captions and articles from the newspaper to tell about the leaders and citizens of their community and to show the breadth of activities of their residents in all walks of life and work. They tell of the milestones and highlights of Latinos in religious, civic, education and government areas of Philadelphia, and share stories of successes in academic, social, business and industry and medical fields of members of their community throughout our largest city."

Picturing Model Citizens

Picturing Model Citizens
Civility in Asian American Visual Culture

Thy Phu

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of MELUS (Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States). The review read, "Picturing Model Citizens provides a new prism through which to view established understandings of the model minority myth and Asian American citizenship. In her brilliant introduction, Phu convincingly argues that civility is central to thinking about citizenship, particularly in relation to the emergence of this myth in the 1960s.... Phu's introduction articulates an important argument about the ways that civility has been overlooked in Asian American Studies.... Picturing Model Citizens is an important study that offers a new perspective from which to view the model minority myth. In placing civility at the center of understanding Asian American citizenship, it is also likely to generate new ways of understanding Asian American history, identity, and community."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger
Foreword by Wynton Marsalis

Reviewed on the website, Jazz History Online on June 1. The review read, "Berger realized that Wilder had an important story to tell, and the result is a superb biography, Softly, With Feeling, which contrasts Wilder's enormous breakthroughs and his humble demeanor.... There's little doubt that Berger's elegantly-written biography will raise awareness of this important but underappreciated jazz giant."

Sustainable Failures

Sustainable Failures
Environmental Policy and Democracy in a Petro-dependent World

Sherry Cable

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of the Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare. The review read, "As Cable makes clear, her analysis...eschews a clear and distinctive break in modes of production between industrial and pre-industrial societies.... Cable justifies her unorthodox approach on the basis that she is interested in humanity's use of the biosphere in relation to how we acquire the resources and energy needed to stay alive, and how they are obtained, whether that be from machines or animal/human labor, and energy from wood, coal or oil.... [C]hapters of her book, particularly her analysis and the attention she pays to environmental racism, are important and refreshing."

Philadelphia Freedoms

Philadelphia Freedoms
Black American Trauma, Memory, and Culture after King

Michael Awkward

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "From its captivating personal narrative of rootedness in the 'city of brotherly love and sisterly affection,' Awkward's self-referential, scholarly treatment presages the rich dynamics constituting the intersections of blackness, race, and 'traumatized black subjectivity' he explores. A model for interdisciplinary scholarship, Philadelphia Freedoms offers a much needed examination of 'commemoration, grief, and riot preventions' across myriad venues: from the experiences of athletes like Chet Walker and performers like James Brown to cultural production, such as music and literature, that challenge black racial oppression, stereotypes of black dysfunction, and black racial trauma in the wake of King's death. Coming full circle, Awkward concludes with Barack Obama, often characterized as the manifestation of 'King's dream,' addressing the particularities of race in America and Philadelphia in efforts to create 'a more perfect union.' Summing Up: Recommended."

The Risk Society Revisited

The Risk Society Revisited
Social Theory and Governance

Eugene A. Rosa, Ortwin Renn and Aaron M. McCright

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "This book takes an abstract approach to a concrete problem: how authorities assess risk and direct social policy accordingly. The authors assume an underlying consensus over the common social good on which decisions are made. They recognize a conflict between experts who rely on math and sciences, and ordinary citizens who rely on anecdotes, hunches, and folklore, but then imply that the common good will best be achieved if laymen submit to professionals' judgment.... Risk is not an unchangeable fact of life. It is created by someone."

Disability and Passing

Disability and Passing
Blurring the Lines of Identity

edited by Jeffrey A. Brune and Daniel J. Wilson

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of The Journal of American History. The review read, "The essays collected in this volume on 'disability and passing' confront the historic and ongoing problem of social acceptance faced by persons in the United States who have lived with various forms of disability and yet choose in various ways to conceal their disability and 'pass' as able-bodied. In so doing, these scholars adapt the familiar idea of racial 'passing' and apply it to the myriad ways that persons with physical or mental impairments have passed as 'normal.'... The chapters include novel analyses of physical conditions not traditionally placed under the rubric of disability, such as mental illness, and they also address situations in which disabilities overlap or in which strong physical or mental competencies mask other disabilities that are partially or entirely concealed.... This collection queries traditional notions of disability in productive and provocative ways.... Taken together, these wide-ranging essays usefully expand the history and scope of disability's consequences in American culture."

Just Queer Folks

Just Queer Folks
Gender and Sexuality in Rural America

Colin R. Johnson

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of The Journal of American History. The review read, "[A] fascinating and gracefully composed dialogue between queer theorists and historians of rural America that expands the geography of queer theory.... Johnson finds that rural Americans at the beginning of the last century did not necessarily subscribe to rigid notions of gender and sexual behavior.... Johnson writes with tremendous sensitivity about queer cultures among working men, hoboes, and the "hard women" of Farm Security Administration portraits who operated on the peripheries of femininity defined by access to consumer goods.... [T]he beauty of Johnson's work is that it is truly synthetic. By focusing on a few well-selected examples he reminds readers that he is building new theoretical foundations. For example, to see [John] D'Emilio in conversation with Mary Neth, a historian of rural women, one realizes that such dialogues are long overdue.... [T]he lively narrative in Just Queer Folks is accessible to readers from a variety of fields."

Modeling Citizenship

Modeling Citizenship
Jewish and Asian American Writing

Cathy Schlund-Vials

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of American Literature. The review read, ""In Modeling Citizenship, Cathy Schlund-Vials deftly moves between readings of twentieth-century Jewish and Asian American literature and the shifting protocols of naturalization policy and immigration law.... She persuasively argues that naturalization is a fluid literary trope with its own affective and performative dimensions, a way of reading, identifying, and performing citizenship."

Chang and Eng Reconnected

Chang and Eng Reconnected
The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture

Cynthia Wu

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of American Literature. The review read, "Chang and Eng Reconnected considers the fascinating and categorically elusive figures of Chang and Eng Bunker in both their historical and fictional manifestations.... Wu is interested in the conjoined twins' attempts to individuate themselves according to the imperatives of national citizenship.... Yet Wu urges her reader not to think of the Bunkers as merely exceptional.... Chang and Eng [Reconnected], in terms of both the material it assembles and the methods shaped according to those materials, is itself categorically elusive and resists the generic expectations of a strictly defined and isolate field of study."

Cinemas in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe after 1989

Cinemas in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe after 1989
edited by Catherine Portuges and Peter Hames

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of Slavic Review. The review read, "This is a highly successful and welcome volume that brings together much information and insight.... Individual chapters efficiently balance an often thriller-like historical narrative, built from dense but well-organized information with plenty of names and events inviting further research, on one hand, with a more elaborate, in-depth interpretation and contextualization of select films and directors, on the other.... All of the chapters have much to recommend them, not least because each one creates its own set of major categories that best capture its own cinema.... In all, Cinemas in Transition is an excellent book full of energy and, at times, a welcome passion. It will be an extremely useful textbook for those of us teaching central and eastern European or world film. A fine read for both scholarly and general audiences, with real insight but no potentially alienating jargon, this book is here to stay. I will return to it often for an insider's look into the fascinating cinemas in transition coming from the (still?) 'lands in-between.'"

Transnationalizing Viet Nam

Transnationalizing Viet Nam
Community, Culture, and Politics in the Diaspora
Kieu-Linh Caroline Valverde

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of International Migration Review. The review read, "The author's four major examples of transnationalism, each chronicled in a chapter, provide evidence of what she sees as positive cultural and informational flows between Vietnamese living in both nations and what she considers to be the disruptive and divisive role that anticommunist politics plays among Vietnamese Americans.... This book contributes to the growing scholarship about former Vietnamese refugees and their children, which has developed in the post-settlement period, especially since the early 21st century, when flows of refugees from Vietnam came to an end. It engages with recent discussions, particularly among Asian American scholars, about what Long Le calls the 'work of anticommunism' among Vietnamese Americans (e.g., Reed-Danahay). Transnationalizing Vietnam [sic] adds to scholarship on the politics of culture and identity among immigrants, by working against a monolithic view of ethnic 'communities.'... It is primarily in her discussions of popular music, the strongest parts of the book, that Valverde provides readers with a sense of what 'everyday' transnationalizing processes might look like."

Blue Juice

Blue Juice
Euthanasia in Veterinary Medicine
Patricia Morris

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of Anthrozoos. The review read, "Blue Juice is a valuable and novel investigation of an act which is so commonplace to veterinarians that having someone from a completely different sphere evaluating what we do is a really useful piece of work. Thank you Dr. Morris."

Savage Portrayals

Savage Portrayals
Race, Media, and the Central Park Jogger Story

Natalie Byfield

Reviewed in Vol. 31, Issue 2, 2014 of American Journalism. The review read, "[Byfield's] insights into covering the story powerfully illustrate the institutionalized relationship between law enforcement agencies and media outlets in the formation of dominant news discourses. Savage Portrayals highlights the connections between the Central Park jogger case and a number of other high-profile and racially divisive court cases to enduring structural and racial inequalities in the 1980s. Byfield clearly and critically examines how through color-blind discourses, factors such as class, sex, and geography act as important stand-ins for race. Perhaps the most important subtext of her argument relates to how class as an indicator of race took on broader significance as an important societal institution.... The continuing significance of race in media depictions of criminality and social order make Byfield's firsthand account of journalistic and criminal justice bias both timely and important."

In a Queer Voice

In a Queer Voice
Journeys of Resilience from Adolescence to Adulthood
Michael Sadowski
Foreword by Carol Gilligan

Reviewed in Vol. 18, Issue 1, 2014 of Journal of Gay & Lesbian Mental Health. The review read, "[An] ambitious and illuminating new book.... The stories in this book are compelling and very much worth the attention of anyone, including educators, parents, mental health professionals, and policy makers, with an interest in the well-being of youth, and LGBTQ youth in particular. In its emphasis on listening to these young people, and connecting to their autobiographies, the book also embodies what might be the most helpful prescription for therapists or other professionals working with this population, creating a space where they can share their life stories in all of their vulnerability, passion, and resilience."

Don't Call Me Inspirational

Don't Call Me Inspirational
A Disabled Feminist Talks Back

Harilyn Rousso

Reviewed in Vol. 29, Issue 4, 2014 of Disability & Society. The review read, "This memoir is one of the most vibrant, refreshing and important explorations of the 'lived experience' of being a disabled woman that I have ever read.... Rousso beautifully describes her life experiences and reflections on her time from east to west coast in the USA (Washington to New York and Boston thus far); she has an engaging humour that makes the book pacey enough to read in one sitting or ideal to pick up in different places and re-read over time. Yet, through this accessible contemporary chronicle, she also manages to demonstrate how disability and gender connect and struggle throughout childhood, teenage anxiety, love, body image, identity and womanhood, without becoming angst-ridden, flippant or overly political.... [A]n important volume that will stand the test of time."

Refounding Environmental Ethics

Refounding Environmental Ethics
Pragmatism, Principle, and Practice

Ben A. Minteer

Reviewed in Vol. 17, Issue 1, 2014 of Ethics, Policy & Environment. The review read, "[A] provocative and important book on the current state of affairs in environmental ethics. It is provocative because his version of pragmatism is advocated in a novel and strategic fashion. It is important because he strongly makes the case that if environmental ethics is to survive as something more than an esoteric subdiscipline of an esoteric profession—that is, if it is to make a genuine difference for non-philosophers and non-humans, alike—then it must adjust to the current situation, which, to be blunt, is dire.... Minteer is deeply and rightly concerned about the present state of environmental ethics.... The closing chapter is a concise and powerful articulation of our current situation.... In his considerate book, Minteer exemplifies this democratic hope with nuance and intelligence—for which we all, humans and non-humans, should be grateful."

The Art of Play

The Art of Play
Recess and the Practice of Invention

Anna R. Beresin

Reviewed in Teachers College Record, on May 29. The review read, "Beresin and her team observe and analyze the children's play, and their responses to the opportunities to play.... The results are both inspiring and disturbing.... The book also includes hundreds of children's ink drawings of their play experiences with Beresin's materials. The value of the opportunity for children to play with art supplies and have a chance to express themselves through art is clear through Beresin's accounts... The images add a playfulness to the text and provide another means of documenting the impact of schoolyard play on children.... The Art of Play makes a strong case for the power of play, in the most fundamental, simple ways, in the lives of children, for the children, for schools, and for society."

Local Protest, Global Movements

Local Protest, Global Movements
Capital, Community, and State in San Francisco

Karl Beitel

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Urban Affairs Review. The review read, "This book is as much a celebration of San Francisco as a brooding about San Francisco's disorganized dissent. Local Protest speaks to academics grappling with the relevance and salience of progressive urban social movements in an era of neoliberal austerity.... Beitel's thoughts about progressive (dis)organization can be useful and instructive.... thought-provoking."

Dominican Baseball

Dominican Baseball
New Pride, Old Prejudice

Alan Klein

Reviewed in the May 10 issue of the Boston Globe. The review read, "[S]uperb.... Klein traces the history of professional baseball's presence on the island nation, the creation and growth of the system for developing players, and the role of player developers, known as 'buscones.' Klein's book demonstrates that Major League Baseball resembles any large corporation in terms of reliance on top-down management to cut costs and maximize profits at the expense of the workers — in this case, the players, their families, and the buscones."

East Is West and West Is East

East Is West and West Is East
Gender, Culture, and Interwar Encounters between Asia and America
Karen Kuo

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of the Journal of American Studies. The review read, "[A] lively and erudite engagement with a range of cultural texts from the interwar period of the early twentieth century. From literature, to film, to autobiography, the reader is cogently guided from text to text with a range of historical and theoretical insights.... Kuo is at her best when she plumbs the depths of intersecting anxieties linked to multiple axes of identity, particularly gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and notions of national belonging. She connects individual stories of self to the transnational flows and exchanges that inform literary, cultural, and economic production.... Organizationally, the book is a highly teachable text for a range of undergraduate and graduate courses in cultural studies, Asian American studies, gender studies, literature and drama, and fits nicely into a growing body of work on American orientalism and transnational American and transpacific studies.... Her conclusion is a tour de force of synthesis and cultural analysis. But to reveal her forceful insights here would be to dilute her carefully argued coda. I leave it to readers to buy the book and mull over Kuo's fine work for themselves."

Don't Call Me Inspirational

Don't Call Me Inspirational
A Disabled Feminist Talks Back

Harilyn Rousso

Reviewed in the May edition of H-Disability. The review read, "Rousso's book Don't Call Me Inspirational is part memoir and part verbal collage.... Many of the vignettes...feel more akin to reading a personal journal entry filled with emotion and nuance....Rousso's writing style is accessible to a non-academic audience as it is free of scholarly jargon and allows various topics to be discussed succinctly. Because of this, her book stands as a useful example of how to create a work that is easy to read by a lay audience while still being both theoretically rich and engaging."

Sportista

Sportista
Female Fandom in the United States
Andrei S. Markovits and Emily Albertson

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "Sportista offers an impressively global (in both senses) discussion on the impact of gender segregation in sport.... [T]his text is a fine feminist critique of hegemonic sport culture, and adds to the library of work demonstrating how gender segregation is detrimental to gender parity in sport and in wider culture."

Where Rivers Meet the Sea

Where Rivers Meet the Sea
The Political Ecology of Water

Stephanie C. Kane

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, ""[A]n engagingly-written ethnography on the legal and cultural dimensions of water.... Kane's analyses shine when they are grounded in the cultural history of place.... Many of the issues, current and long-standing, that she examines find bedrock in these histories that give the stories their uniqueness of place in a globally connected world. The few words here cannot capture the thoughtful cultural analyses that occur throughout this book. The images provided by the author add welcomed dimension to the stories told."

Sport and Neoliberalism

Sport and Neoliberalism
Politics, Consumption, and Culture

edited by David L. Andrews and Michael L. Silk

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "For those interested in a critical analysis of sport, this collection has merit. Many of the articles are well written and carefully analyze the intricate relationship between neoliberalism and sport.'"

Reframing Transracial Adoption

Reframing Transracial Adoption
Adopted Koreans, White Parents, and the Politics of Kinship

Kristi Brian

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "Brian exhibits a strong conversant history and literature on race and adoption.... She is particularly good at critiquing transracial adoption by celebrity... she raises the intriguing issue of how adoptees themselves are now changing the processes of adoption.... Brian's book provides an excellent critique of the hidden racism in American adoptions."

Sustainable Failures

Sustainable Failures
Environmental Policy and Democracy in a Petro-dependent World

Sherry Cable

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "Cable, an experienced and thoughtful environmental sociologist, in her latest book takes on important and difficult issues surrounding the development, implementation, and especially efficacy of environmental policy....This short and accessible book....[i]s well organized, interesting and clearly written. In addition to the broader arguments that run through the book, there are many well-chosen examples of particular environmental problems, events, and legislation that keep the book grounded and engaged with issues that are likely familiar to most undergraduates.... [T]his work is nonetheless also worthy of being read by established scholars, since it presents analyses that are relevant to a variety of debates among researchers."

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America
The Argentine Puzzle in Context

Claudia Kedar

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "Kedar makes meticulous use of IMF documents dating back to the 1940s, and triangulates with Argentine government documents and materials from the U.S. and British National Archives....[T]wo things about this book set it apart from the familiar chronicle. The first is its firm grounding in an impressive array of original historical documents.... Second, Kedar is part of a new movement of scholars seeking to update traditional theoretical understandings of what international financial institutions do and why they do it.... Kedar draws on newly-available information to present a different view of the IMF as a bureaucracy with its own bureaucratic interests, which do not always coincide with the interests of the U.S. government."

How We Die Now

How We Die Now
Intimacy and the Work of Dying

Karla A. Erickson

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of Choice. The review read, "How We Die Now attempts to make observations regarding the work of death for Americans in the 21st century. Clearly, death experiences are as unique as lives.... Erickson bases the greater part of the text upon a multilevel extended care facility and its residents and staff.... The brief glimpses into these data were the bright spots of the work. The author touches on why aging Americans may want to avoid extended care facilities, racial disparities, and fears that surround nursing care facilities for the aged. The sort of multileveled facility that is the center of the study is often seen as desirable and preferable to traditional nursing home facilities.... Summing Up: Recommended."

Where Rivers Meet the Sea

Where Rivers Meet the Sea
The Political Ecology of Water

Stephanie C. Kane

Reviewed in the May 2014 issue of PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review. The review read, "Beautifully written and refreshingly free from jargon, Stephanie Kane's Where Rivers Meet the Sea is a rich ethnography of the practices and the discourses spun around river and sea waters at two Latin American sites: Salvador da Bahia in Brazil, and Buenos Aires in Argentina, whose aquatic cultures Kane analyzes in their everyday but also their political and technoscientific dimensions....What emerges throughout Kane's ethnography is the disturbing tension between the pervasiveness of environmental crimes on one hand, and their elusiveness and even widespread naturalization on the other. Kane's argument that all human beings are 'implicated in toxic survival modes' is a powerful take-home lesson: one that encourages a critical reflection on various levels and shades of complicity with environmental crimes. A thought-provoking ethnography, Where Rivers Meet the Sea is recommended for anyone with an interest in gaining a nuanced perspective on the political ecology of water."

Sex and the Founding Fathers

Sex and the Founding Fathers
The American Quest for a Relatable Past

Thomas A. Foster

Reviewed on the website The Arts Fuse on April 30. The review read, "[I]nteresting and informative.... Foster is at his most provocative when he traces how public discussions of sex and our American patriarchs have evolved over the past few centuries."

Sex and the Founding Fathers was also reviewed on the blog The Nerdy Word on May 6. The review read, "The most interesting character in the whole book was Gouverneur Morris.... [I] recommend the book if you are at all interested in American History, especially the founding of the New Republic."

Distant Corners

Distant Corners
American Soccer's History of Missed Opportunities and Lost Causes

David Wangerin

Reviewed on the website World Soccer Talk on April 17. The review read, "The book shares some of the in-depth stories of key moments in U.S. soccer history where the game could have taken off, but for various reasons did not.... If this book is to be taken as a chronicle of stories forgotten and times unremembered, it is an absolute gem.... [I]t is an essential read for anyone who wants to know the real history of soccer in this football world."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger
Foreword by Wynton Marsalis

Received a starred review in the April 15 issue of Library Journal. The review read, "Writer/photographer Berger's approach in this biography encompasses not only Wilder's career, but also offers a vivid and well-researched depiction of both jazz and Broadway orchestras and a picture of the unheralded musician that is fascinating reading.... Berger's highly readable account is clearly an overdue testament to the performer's skills and accomplishments. VERDICT: [T]his wonderful book should be read by anyone interested in jazz or classical music; it belongs in every library."

Dominican Baseball

Dominican Baseball
New Pride, Old Prejudice

Alan Klein

Reviewed on the website Camden Depot on April 14. The review read, "[T]he book is one of contemplative advocacy.... [I]t is one of the several volumes that should grace your book shelf in order to make you competent in discussing international baseball."

Young Men, Time, and Boredom in the Republic of Georgia

Young Men, Time, and Boredom in the Republic of Georgia
Martin Demant Frederiksen

Reviewed online in Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology April 3, 2014. The review read, "The author spent approximately a year participating in the lives of 30 underemployed young men.... The author has a keen eye for telling ethnographic details, and liberal use of his graphic field notes makes it clear that he was an accepted and even cherished member of these brotherhoods. Moreover, his evocative photographs of various sites help to transport the reader into post-Soviet Georgia. There are funny scenes in this touching ethnography and a wealth of insight, as well, but the overall tone of these observations is poignant.... From these lives, the author extracts a rich conceptual framework.... The author concludes that his informants experience 'temporal marginalization' – an ingenious concept with wide applicability."

Sex and the Founding Fathers

Sex and the Founding Fathers
The American Quest for a Relatable Past

Thomas A. Foster

Reviewed in The Researching Librarian on April 2. The review read, "Foster traces how the sex lives (what we know about them, which in most cases is not much) have changed in biographies over time from right after the Revolutionary War to now. It is a fascinating look at how society has perceived the Founders, and the importance of their sex lives is to the public."

Making Modern Love

Making Modern Love
Sexual Narratives and Identities in Interwar Britain

Lisa Z. Sigel

Reviewed in the April 2014 issue of the American Historical Review. The review read, "Making Modern Love is a fascinating contribution.... Sigel successfully achieves one of the principal aims of her book: to show how ordinary people (as opposed to sexologists, sex reformers, and writers) wielded agency in the articulation of sexual stories and in framing their own 'sexual selves.'... There are many specific things to praise in Making Modern Love. Sigel's empathetic and nuanced reading of a variety of sources is one.... Sigel's book remains an important intervention in our understanding of sexual lives in twentieth-century Britain."

A City within a City

A City within a City
The Black Freedom Struggle in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Todd E. Robinson

Reviewed in the April 2014 issue of the American Historical Review. The review read, "A City within a City makes an important contribution to the growing body of scholarship employing the 'long civil rights movement' and 'black freedom studies' approach. In this study, Robinson successfully makes the case for the importance of examining the history of secondary cities by exploring the black fight for equality in Grand Rapids, Michigan at the community level in response to local conditions and concerns."

Workers of the World, Enjoy!

Workers of the World, Enjoy!
Aesthetic Politics from Revolutionary Syndicalism to the Global Justice Movement

Kenneth H. Tucker, Jr.

Reviewed in the April 2014 issue of the American Historical Review. The review read, "When Tucker suppl[ies] gritty detail to echo his lucid discussions of major aesthetic theorists...he makes clear that critical attention to aesthetic politics is urgent."


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