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The International Monetary Fund and Latin America

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America
The Argentine Puzzle in Context

Claudia Kedar

Reviewed in the Spring 2015 issue of Latin American Politics and Society. The review read, "Kedar's book on the role of the IMF in Argentina is a truly welcome addition. It provides perhaps one of the most comprehensive accounts of the fund's historical interaction with the region since the establishment of the Bretton Woods institutions.... [T]he book is a well-written and thoroughly enjoyable piece of research. It adds an important revisionist perspective to IMF-Argentine relations and depicts a far more nuanced and mutually dependent relationship than is commonly portrayed, both in Latin America and elsewhere.... This is an excellent book, which anyone interested in IMF relations with Latin America, and even the fund more generally, should read."

Sex and the Founding Fathers

Sex and the Founding Fathers
The American Quest for a Relatable Past

Thomas A. Foster

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of the Journal of American History. The review read, "Foster tells us that each new generation has inquired into the intimate lives of great men and found reflections of its own habits and desires and anxieties....Using the methods of intellectual and cultural history, Foster examines contemporary and scholarly interpretations of the sex lives of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and Gouvernor Morris. Foster holds that we read and write about our Founding Fathers' intimate habits because we want these icons of masculinity to be relatable. Foster is right; we do seek ourselves in our histories."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger

Reviewed in the March 2015 issue of Jazzwise. The review read, "A major strand of this well-wrought biography is a lengthy examination of the mid-century employment possibilities for African-American musicians in commercial and symphonic music.... [I]f ever a book cried out for a bound-in CD...it is this one, for its text is suffused with praise for Wilder's trumpet tone, his lyrical grace and total assurance whatever the musical circumstances."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Featured in the winter-spring 2015 issue of Work History News, a newsletter published by the New York Labor History Association. A review of Frank's book read, "Out in the Union tells the important, often neglected story of the intersection between union folks and gay folks as it evolves through time. In the early 21st century, this seems like a surprising overlap, but Frank demonstrates, through densely researched political and labor history and through direct personal narrative, how these two threads have been braided, and need to remain so as we continue to fight for social justice. Frank explains the history and the structure of the labor movement in the USA by putting compelling stories of local change within regional, national, and temporal frames.... Frank's important book will continue to shape policy, organizing, and scholarship for years to come."

Envisioning Emancipation

Envisioning Emancipation
Black Americans and the End of Slavery

Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer

Reviewed in the February 2015 issue of the Journal of Southern History. The review read, "This fascinating collection demonstrates not only a broad range of photographic technologies, but also the numerous ways African Americans actively participated in the photographic practice.... [they] reveal how complicated the process of emancipation and freedom could be.... [T]hrough Willis and Krauthamer's efforts [historians] may also come to know what emancipation looked like and how those freed participated in and responded to the event. The authors expertly use historical photographs to deepen our understanding of the black experience of slavery and emancipation."

America's First Adventure in China

America's First Adventure in China
Trade, Treaties, Opium, and Salvation

John R. Haddad

Reviewed in the February 2015 issue of Pacific Historical Review. The review read, "John R. Haddad is to be congratulated for taking a large and long view of American relations with China, 1784-1870.... [T]he analysis of the intricacies of U.S. diplomacy through this period is quite good."

Just Queer Folks

Just Queer Folks
Gender and Sexuality in Rural America

Colin R. Johnson

Reviewed in the February 2015 issue of the American Historical Review. The review read, "In this book Johnson takes to task many of the central assumptions historians and others make about gender and sexuality in America: that rural spaces were especially heteronormative; that queer people were typically progressive; that queer behavior was uncommon in rural places; that Americans' discourse about sexuality developed in cities and later spread to the countryside; and that the twentieth century witnessed a gradual increase in the erotic, emotional, and political possibility with regards to gender and sexuality. To these assumptions Johnson brings a wealth of evidence to the contrary.... It is difficult to do justice to either the sweeping claims or the nuanced insights that enliven the pages of this book in such a short review. It suffices to say, though, that the field has been waiting for this book. Elegantly written, forcefully argued, heterodox but also humane, Just Queer Folks is a model of historical scholarship."

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America
The Argentine Puzzle in Context

Claudia Kedar

Reviewed in the February 2015 issue of Economic History Review. The review read, "The International Monetary Fund and Latin America provides insights into local politics and the politics of international bodies, and the capacity of events to surprise even seasoned practitioners. There is accessible background on the politics and economies of Argentinian decline (and frustrated attempts to reverse decline).... Kedar also confirms the cynical assessment that, if you visit the doctor at the Fund, you know what the prescription will be."

Consuming Work

Consuming Work
Youth Labor in America

Yasemin Besen-Cassino

Reviewed in the February 2015 issue of Gender & Society. The review read, "Consuming Work is a book of uncommon breadth. The book is divided into six substantive chapters and examines a range of considerations relating to the subject of youth work.... Besen-Cassino covers tremendous ground, utilizing a range of materials for analysis including ethnographic, in-depth interview and survey data on youth workers between the ages of 16 and 21.... The take-away is greater breadth of understanding of the complex field of youth employment and a deeper appreciation of the meaning and purpose with which American youth who do work, work.... [W]e are left with a deeper appreciation of the role meaning plays in structuring youth labor, how inequalities in work are reproduced, and the shifting terrain of youths' social worlds."

Conceiving Masculinity

Conceiving Masculinity
Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity

Liberty Walther Barnes

Reviewed online first in the February 2015 issue of Gender & Society. The review read, "In Conceiving Masculinity, Barnes deftly analyzes the bind that male infertility doctors encounter: they need to debunk the stereotype that infertility is a woman's issue in order to attract clients and advance their profession, yet they feel compelled to protect the masculinity of their clients in face-to-face interaction.... Conceiving Masculinity is an accessible read that could inform students in gender, health, and sexuality courses. Barnes' attention to the interactions between levels of gender results in an intriguing analysis of how gender is reconstructed even in context where it is professionally beneficial to challenge cultural assumptions about men and reproduction."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the January/February 2015 issue of Against the Current. The review read, "By recounting this history of U.S. queer labor organizing from the 1960s to the present, Frank is uncovering a largely unknown history, in the process helping to fill a large gap in both U.S. labor and queer history.... Out in the Union places queer history within the broader context of labor history of the United States, helping to foster a greater understanding of the interplay between larger developments in the labor movement and queer labor activism. Above all else, Miriam Frank's examination is a history of queer labor activism that tells this history from the perspective of queer workers at the grassroots.... Out in the Union deserves a wide readership by activists in the labor movement, both straight and LGBT. It is a major contribution to both the fields of queer history and labor history. For the first time, a broad history of queer activism within the U.S. labor movement has been published, asserting that queer people work to make a living too, and have fought hard to combat discrimination both at work and in their unions."

Just Queer Folks

Just Queer Folks
Gender and Sexuality in Rural America

Colin R. Johnson

Reviewed in Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory, 2014. The review read, "Johnson draws from the early twentieth century to amass the impressive archive of country queerness that challenges both the political Right's and the mainstream gay and lesbian community's image of American rurality.... It is his ability to read the expanse of rural America that makes Johnson's book an extraordinary contribution to what he recognizes as the 'rural turn' in queer studies over the last decade.... One of Johnson's most astute contributions to the rural turn is his ability to explain the difficulty for scholars to breach the rural-urban divide.... Johnson's book is an accomplishment of seeing beyond established boundaries of queer studies, to the queer folks who have established lives 'out there,' in the unknowns of rural America."

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America
The Argentine Puzzle in Context

Claudia Kedar

Featured in a combined review in the January 2015 issue of Latin American Perspectives. The review read, "The International Monetary Fund and Latin America traces the long path of this multilateral agency's relations with Argentina.... A welcome aspect of the book is its calling attention to the way the IMF's dependency routine...is imposed and the fact that without relationships with the countries in which it acts it just would not happen.... [The book] enriche[s] the field of international relations [and] provide[s] us with valuable insights."

The Public and Its Possibilities

The Public and Its Possibilities
Triumphs and Tragedies in the American City

John D. Fairfield

Featured in a review essay in the January 2015 issue of the Journal of Urban History. The review read, "[A] sweeping account of democracy in urban America...Fairfield's impressive synthesis brings together decades of secondary literature covering American urban and political history in a narrative that locates the city as the testing ground for more expansive definitions of citizenship and national belonging."

On Intellectual Activism

On Intellectual Activism
Patricia Hill Collins

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "On Intellectual Activism is a welcome addition to the conversation about the deeply contradictory relationship between the academy and the street, between scholars and the movement, and what progressive and revolutionary intellectuals must do. Patricia Hill Collins speaks truth to the people and truth to power in the voice of black feminism and a politically engaged intellectual activism in the service of twenty-first century social justice, a project she envisions to confront today's gender, race, sexual, and class oppression, exploitation, and injustice in the United States and global society.... On Intellectual Activism is an accessible and rich toolbox. Collins uses storytelling, translates the language of academic theory into the language of people's lives, and clarifies new forms of racism and oppression. Her voice resonates with multiple publics—students, scholars, and communities. She offers a reality check and a refreshing critique of dominant and mainstream voices and forces in sociology and society. She validates the experience of sociological rebels and intellectual activists who are marginalized within the discipline, the profession, and the university where many of us practice our craft and juggle the contradictions of academic survival and social justice demands."

Catheters, Slurs, and Pickup Lines

Catheters, Slurs, and Pickup Lines
Professional Intimacy in Hospital Nursing

Lisa C. Ruchti

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "[A]n insightful, well-written, and well-organized book that discusses how framing nursing as professional labor has been an important part of a long battle that nurses have fought to be taken seriously in the medical industry. Ruchti suggests that a dichotomy of professionalism and care persists in part because intimacy, as part of bedside care, seems unprofessional. In this book, Ruchti uncovers how professionally intimate care work fits into the larger system of commercialized and commodified intimacies and demonstrates how nurses, administrators, and patients idealize care, which only serves to reinforce the misunderstanding of this labor.... The book should be of significant use to anyone interested in patient and quality healthcare, the nursing profession, the growing diversity in nursing, and implications for the nursing shortage."

How We Die Now

How We Die Now
Intimacy and the Work of Dying
Karla A. Erickson

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "[A]t the end of the book, in its final chapters as it were, that issues of dying are really addressed.... Erickson values longer life, thinks that the dependency it brings can be a good thing, can teach us all more about interdependency and caring."

Resisting Work

Resisting Work
The Corporatization of Life and Its Discontents

Peter Fleming

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "Fleming argues that our very lives are becoming corporatizationalized and that it is now increasingly difficult, if not impossible, to separate the work self from the private self. This phenomenon comes not from individuals choosing to invest more of their time and energy into their work, but rather from people being forced, most often implicitly, into breaking down the barriers that separate the public and private spheres.... Fleming's prose and use of vignettes, stories, and data help to provide any reader with a solid command of the material by the end of the book. Resisting Work is important for anyone interested in the changing nature of work and what it means for the lives of the workers."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed on the Labor Notes website January 7. The review read, "The comprehensive new history, Out in the Union, reveals previously uncollected stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer labor activists and activism for LGBTQ equality.... Most histories tend to 'heterowash' any LGBTQ person's truth—if their stories are told at all. This significant book uncovers the truths too often hidden away, adding to the experiences of many LGBTQ leaders to labor's collective history. These stories are essential to a contemporary understanding of union solidarity."

The Outsider

The Outsider
Albert M. Greenfield and the Fall of the Protestant Establishment

Dan Rottenberg

Reviewed in the January 4 issue of Ticket, a supplement to the Main Line Times. The review read, "History buffs will enjoy a fascinating biography of Albert M. Greenfield, a real estate tycoon whose long career helped shaped Philadelphia in the 20th Century.... In this engaging and thoroughly researched book, Rottenberg brings to life a man who befriended presidents Hoover, Roosevelt, Truman and Johnson, as well as Pennsylvania politicians of his day. He also forged coalitions between Jews, Catholics and blacks during his long career."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Berger makes another excellent contribution to jazz literature with this biography of the unsung trumpeter Joe Wilder (1922-2014). Wilder's life was not particularly filled with drama, but this dignified gentleman suffered the expected incidents of racism while coming of age in Philadelphia, in road bands, and in the armed forces during WW II.... Berger describes the racial integration...in detail. He also chronicles Wilder's long recording career, and includes a discography. Summing Up: Recommended."

Also reviewed on Ethan Iverson's influential blog, Do the Math on January 21. The entry read, "Ed Berger does jazz history a special service by getting to know his heroes while working on biographies that end up being unusually definitive.... Berger also makes it crystal clear that playing jazz was just part of Wilder's story. Breaking of Barriers in American Music lives up to its title as Wilder helps integrate the Armed Forces, Broadway, staff orchestras, and symphonic orchestras. I was especially impressed with Berger's research."

The NFL

The NFL
Critical and Cultural Perspectives
edited by Thomas P. Oates and Zack Furness

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "The National Football League continues to have a significant cultural impact on American life. But how and why has this occurred? This interesting and informative collection of critical essays does an admirable job of answering this question.... This worthwhile volume is enhanced by a comprehensive index. Summing Up: Highly recommended."

The War on Slums in the Southwest

The War on Slums in the Southwest
Public Housing and Slum Clearance in Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico, 1935-1965

Robert B. Fairbanks

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "This thoroughly researched regional study of how five southwestern cities—Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Phoenix, and Albuquerque—approached slum clearance and public housing has value for students interested in regionalism, urbanism, and the politics of social welfare.... Fairbanks provides a unique regional perspective useful for undergraduates and specialists alike. Summing Up: Highly recommended."

Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood

Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood
Brooklyn's Sunset Park

Tarry Hum

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Hum presents a compelling analysis of contemporary economic and racial dynamics in the primarily Asian and Latino Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn. With a long family history in the neighborhood, she brings a community insider's approach to this primarily qualitative study. Throughout the work, the author is also engaged in a broader theoretical project. Rejecting the traditional scholarly conceptualization of immigrant neighborhoods as ghettos or enclaves, Hum attempts to situate neighborhood formations and social and economic change in Sunset Park in an analytical context that takes in the influences of the postindustrial urban economy, the racialization of immigrant populations, and the neoliberal policy environment that has prevailed in New York City in recent decades..... [T]his work will be of strongest interest to undergraduate and graduate students and scholars of Asian American studies, urban studies, and urban planning. Summing Up: Highly Recommended."

The Concept of the Social in Uniting the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Concept of the Social in Uniting the Humanities and Social Sciences
Michael E. Brown

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "The argument advanced in this book is that the social is a fundamental, irreducible given that should be the central object of inquiry in the social sciences and humanities. Brown makes this case in what he surely views as a major corrective to these broad scholarly fields."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the January 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Frank conducted over 100 personal interviews across two decades before compiling this well-researched account of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transsexuals involved with local, regional, and nationwide labor unions. The author chronicles intersections between LGBT social and political movements, and labor movements, in the US from 1965 to 2013.... Its insightful coverage of variously sized unions and types of work places—discussing both strengths and weaknesses—gives readers a good historical look at the ebb and flow of relationships between 'queer' America and labor movements. Additionally, the book discusses some of the relationship problems at home, as interviewees reflect on their transitions of becoming involved in social or union activism. The thorough notes, bibliography, and index make this a good resource for future researchers on social history, gender studies, labor movements, and LGBT/queer movements. Summing Up: Highly recommended."

Women in Politics in the American City

Women in Politics in the American City
Mirya R. Holman

Reviewed in the January, 2015 issue of Library Journal. The review read, "Holman poses an unusual question on a topic few have studied: Does electing women to municipal office make a difference in policy decisions? The author answers that women mayors and council members bring a neglected perspective to policymaking and support women's issues...more frequently than men in local office.... Holman's research relies on interviews and surveys, and the book is replete with tables and diagrams, copious notes, an extensive bibliography, and several appendixes."

Resisting Work

Resisting Work
The Corporatization of Life and Its Discontents

Peter Fleming

Reviewed online first in Administrative Science Quarterly. The review read, "The core argument of the book is that neoliberalism and managerialism have proved themselves to be unworkable, undermining many of the social supports that they rely on to operate.... firmly grounded in critical and neo-Marxist perspectives, which inform its analysis and central conclusions.... [Its] strength comes from its juxtaposition of debates that usually take place within different communities.... [I]t is thought provoking to reconsider these questions from the perspective of exploitation and class struggle. Some of the most compelling material lies in the analysis of how earlier approaches to management by culture have given way to a system in which workers are encouraged not to conform to corporate culture but rather to bring their whole selves to work in order to better benefit the firm... The book makes many intriguing points... [and] provides a valuable perspective on extremely timely and important issues."

God Talk

God Talk
Experimenting with the Religious Causes of Public Opinion

Paul A. Djupe and Brian R. Calfano

Reviewed in the Winter 2014 issue of Public Opinion Quarterly. The review read, "God Talk provides a rich account of how religion shapes candidate and policy preferences. Through carefully constructed, executed, and analyzed experiments, the authors provide a more precise explanation of how religion is politically consequential.... God Talk offers one of the most thorough accounts of how religion functions in contemporary American politics, particularly in the context of political communication. The authors describe the bounds of elite influence, and they generate a more psychologically informed description of how religious labels serve as social identities. The book is an important read for those interested in the dynamics of public opinion and attitude change."

Making Modern Love

Making Modern Love
Sexual Narratives and Identities in Interwar Britain

Lisa Z. Sigel

Reviewed in the Winter 2014 issue of the Journal of Social History. The review read, "Lisa Sigel reaffirms the significance of...narrative in the making of sexual identities in interwar Britain.... There is some fascinating material here."

Sex and the Founding Fathers

Sex and the Founding Fathers
The American Quest for a Relatable Past

Thomas A. Foster

Reviewed in American Studies, Vol. 53, No. 4. The review read, "Sex and the Founding Fathers has value as a source of data.... [which] raises important questions about gender, sexuality, and masculinity as normative and actual behaviors shift that over time as they structure personal and national identities."

Atlanta Unbound

Atlanta Unbound
Enabling Sprawl through Policy and Planning

Carlton Wade Basmajian

Reviewed in American Studies, Vol. 53, No. 4. The review read, "Basmajian explores how regional planners engaged with Atlanta and post-World War II expansion.... [He] has masterfully charted the course of the Atlanta Regional Commission.... Threaded with both thoughtful analysis and rambunctious newspaper accounts.... Atlanta Unbound provides a powerful resource for considering an evolving relationship between ideology and material landscapes."

The Archival Turn in Feminism

The Archival Turn in Feminism
Outrage in Order
Kate Eichhorn

Featured in a review essay in the Winter 2015 issue of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. The review read, "The Archival Turn in Feminism is a trenchant engagement with archival research of activist feminist practices during the 1990s and early 2000s.... Eichhorn thoughtfully interrogates feminist archival practice to think about the relationship between the practices of archiving and feminist activism during the past forty years, and she generously encourages readers to do the same.... Eichhorn's chapter on the Riot Grrrl movement is interesting and provocative... [Her] attention to method and her innovative approach, combining ethnography, archival research, and cultural theory, mark The Archival Turn as a productive contribution to conversations about feminist methodologies."

Resisting Work

Resisting Work
The Corporatization of Life and Its Discontents
Peter Fleming

Reviewed in the December 2014 issue of Labor Studies Journal. The review read, The review read, "Fleming outlines a progression of capitalist management through several eras. Fleming closes this interesting book with a section proposing that in the current era, in which work has penetrated all of life, the only effective response is an 'exit' from work, where workers refuse to demand recognition but instead silently turn away. This, too, is not a new idea in the world of work resistance but is provocative nonetheless.... Resisting Work is a substantial and worthwhile read for theoreticians."

Citizenship and Governance in a Changing City

Citizenship and Governance in a Changing City
Somerville, MA

Susan A. Ostrander

Reviewed in the December 2014 issue of Nonproft and Voluntary Sector Quartery. The review read, "Ostrander's book is worthy of attention as it expands the current discussion of citizen participation at the local level with an emphasis on incorporating immigrant populations. This book deserves a place on the shelves of scholars interested in participatory democracy and civil society development as well as policy makers interested in immigrant engagement."

Accessible Citizenships

Accessible Citizenships
Disability, Nation, and the Cultural Politics of Greater Mexico

Julie Avril Minich

Reviewed on H-Net's H-Disability, December 2014. The review read, "Breaking new transdisciplinary ground in disability studies and Latin American studies, Minich presents a highly insightful and rigorous study of the ways in which the 'ideology of ability' has been repeatedly represented in Chicana/o texts, images, and film.... Accessible Citizenships presents a nuanced and methodologically sophisticated discussion rooted in literary criticism of cultural works, drawing upon Minich's background in comparative literature, linguistics, and Latin American studies.... Accessible Citizenships is a convincing and essential read."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the December 2014 issue of WorkingUSA. The review read, "Frank's Out in the Union breaks new ground in detailing the experiences of LGBT people in trade unions, and exploring the relation between the labor movement and the LGBT rights movement.... Frank's text makes an important contribution to LGBT studies and labor studies."

Resisting Work

Resisting Work
The Corporatization of Life and Its Discontents

Peter Fleming

Reviewed in the December 2014 issue of Choice. The review read, "[Fleming] argues that work has taken over our lives because we have internalized the need to work and produce at all times.... The book ultimately finds its niche among other works of applied critical theory and analyses of employee engagement, corporate culture, managerialism, capitalism, and meaningful work. Summing Up: Recommended."

Church and State in the City

Church and State in the City
Catholics and Politics in Twentieth-Century San Francisco

William Issel

Reviewed in the December 2014 issue of The Journal of American History read, "In Church and State in the City the venerable historian William Issel provides an in-depth examination of the juxtaposition of Catholic teaching—both social and economic—and the search for a vision of the public interest as it played out in San Francisco's public policy-making debates from the 1890s to the 1970s.... [T]his impressive political history of twentieth-century San Francisco will be fruitful reading for any student interested in urban history in general, or group-based politics in particular."

Also reviewed in the December 2014 issue of The Journal of Church and State read, "William Issel integrates religious, political, and economic history into a largely persuasive interpretation of San Francisco's history that places religion at the center of public life from the twentieth century's earliest years to its final decades.... The work draws deeply from Issel's lifetime study of San Francisco, and the result is an impressively detailed exploration of those whose voices rose to significance in the debates.... Readers...will no doubt appreciate Issel's thorough presentation of the way one religious denomination helped to steer a significant American city as its residents sought to define and work toward the common good."

Savage Portrayals

Savage Portrayals
Race, Media, and the Central Park Jogger Story

Natalie Byfield

Reviewed in the December 1 issue of the journal Social Forces. The review read, "[C]ompelling...Byfield's role as reporter for the Daily News in the late 1980s and early 1990s provides a valuable lens through which to view the inner workings of a major newsroom.... Students and scholars of news media will find Byfield's analysis of the institutionalized relationship between the police and media nothing short of extraordinary."


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